MSc Diplomacy and International Governance degree

Entry requirements
2:2+
Full-time
1 year
Part-time
2-4 years
Start date
September 2020
UK / EU fee
£10,900
International fee
£19,600
Application status
Open

Overview

Our MSc Diplomacy and International Governance programme provides an umbilical link between theory and practice, providing training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy and international governance.

You will learn how to apply concepts and knowledge from scholarly research to the practice of diplomacy and statecraft across the world today. Our MSc Diplomacy and International Governance students will learn in an environment tailor-made for the development of diplomatic skills at an inspiring new campus in London, one of the world’s greatest cities and home to 163 Embassies and High Commissions.

You will be provided with a specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of diplomacy deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with practice in the field. Our MSc Diplomacy and International Governance students are challenged to acquire a critical awareness of the New World Order and how this concept relates to current issues involved in the study of diplomacy, learning from the past to deal with the challenges of the future.

Who should study this programme?

This MSc Diplomacy and International Governance programme is suited to individuals with an interest in developing their critical awareness of how current issues affect the practice of diplomacy and statecraft across the world. Those wishing to gain advanced skills and expertise in order to pursue a career in diplomacy, international relations, communications or another related field, should consider this master's degree in diplomacy and international governance.

Why you should choose us

Why you should study this degree

Bryn Proudlove-Wilkes

Hear from Bryn about studying within the The Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance and what postgraduate life is like at Loughborough University London.

What makes this programme different?

  • Academic expertise in Brexit Diplomacy and Multi-Stakeholder negotiations 
  • Discover the latest research affecting global secuirty, extremism and foreign policy 
  • Critical awareness of the New World Order
  • Learn how to deal with the challenges of the future
  • Study in London, home to 163 Embassies and High Commissions
  • 100% of students agree they are satisfied with the quality of this course* - Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey 2018
  • 94% of students agree that engagement for this programme was high* - Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey 2018

*Based on responses from 88.5% of the 2017-18 cohort for the Institue for Diplomacy and International Governance. More information

What you'll study

You will learn from the most influential thought leaders, pioneering researchers and creative innovators, exposing you to the latest theories and developments from across your discipline.

Modules

Our MSc Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy covers a wide range of topics; to give you a taster we have expanded on some of the modules affiliated with this programme and the specific assessment methods associated with each module.

The following information is intended as an example only and is based on module information for the 2019/20 year of entry. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes. Updated Programme and Module Specifications are made available ahead of each academic year. Please see Terms and Conditions of Study for more information.

Collaborative Project

With a multi-talented group of students you will work on a brief from a real company looking to solve a real social or business problem.

Together with your student team, you will research and build solutions to a business problem, supported by our project tutors, clients and staff. Previous clients include Foster + Partners, Speedo, The London Legacy Development Corporation as well as many other companies, start-ups and charities.

The Collaborative Project provides a means for you to engage in critical enquiry and to be exposed to project-based teamwork in multicultural and interdisciplinary settings. By undertaking this module, you will strengthen your cooperative and collaborative working skills and competencies, whilst raising your awareness and appreciation of cultural and disciplinary diversity and differences.

The Collaborative Project aims to provide you with a hands-on experience of identifying, framing and resolving practice-oriented and real-world based challenges and problems, using creativity and appropriate tools to achieve valuable and relevant solutions. Alongside the collaborative elements of the module, you will be provided with opportunities to network with stakeholders, organisations and corporations, which will give you the experience and skills needed to connect to relevant parties and potentially develop future employment opportunities.

Concepts and Controversies in Diplomacy and International Governance

This insightful module will look at the latest controversies and debates affecting diplomacy and international governance, alongside the evolution of the international system. You will develop an understanding of how the Vienna convention influences diplomatic relations, whilst considering the role of institutions and actors in contemporary international governance. Diplomatic negotiation and international bargaining are key aspects of this module, as well as the study of international diplomacy and governance in the 21st Century.
 
The aim of this module to introduce students to the concepts, theories and controversies underpinning the study of international diplomacy and international governance.
 
Topics studied may include:
  • Diplomacy as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques
  • The concepts, theories and controversies of contemporary international governance
  • The processes of diplomatic policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves
  • The role of assessment, advocacy, bargaining and persuasion as dynamic features in the study of diplomacy
  • The concepts and ethics of diplomacy in a professional environment
  • Identifying appropriate sources
  • How to formulate research questions and research strategies 
  • How to demonstrate oral communication skills appropriate for professional use
  • The application of research management and self-learning skills, as well as enhanced communication and ICT skills
  • Managing research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy

Foreign Policy Analysis

This module will explore a number of contemporary foreign policy topics, such as: foreign policy: the system level; foreign policy: the state level (bureaucracy); foreign policy: the state level (public opinion, media, interest groups); foreign policy: the level of the individual decision-maker; and the role of ideas and identities in foreign policy. In addition, a number of case studies will be explored as part of the learning, including: US foreign policy, UK foreign policy, and China's foreign policy.

The aim of this module is to the aim of this module is for you to understand the conceptual tools of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA), acquire specific knowledge relevant to an understanding of the foreign policies of key state actors in the global arena, and develop awareness of the issues and policy contexts that shape these policies.

Topics studied may include:

  • The analysis of foreign policy within the field of International Relations
  • Key concepts and terminology of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA)
  • Key issues shaping the formulation and implementation of foreign policy
  • Applying this knowledge to specific cases of foreign policy decision-making and compare these cases in a systematic manner
  • Locating FPA information and evidence from primary and secondary sources
  • Identifying the main approaches to the study of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) and Comparative Foreign Policy (CFP)
  • Critically assessing foreign policy practice
  • Employing critical judgement in relation to case studies of US and UK foreign policy
  • Locating and using appropriate evidence base in a critical essay
  • Reflecting on your own learning and making effective use of constructive feedback from your module tutor and peers

The Art of Governance: Diplomacy, Negotiation and Lobbying

The aim of the module is to familiarise students with the theory, frameworks and practice of governance in every aspect.

The module will provide you with a thorough overview of all of the different ways, including questions of professional practice, in which governance is undertaken, negotiated and influenced.

Topics studied may include:

  • Concepts and theories of diplomacy, negotiation and lobbying as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques
  • The processes of policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves
  • The importance of diplomacy, assessment, advocacy, bargaining, negotiation and persuasion as dynamic features of the art of governance
  • How to approach different real-life, professional situations using the frameworks of diplomacy, negotiation and lobbying
  • Evaluating the appropriateness of differing problem-solving skills for differing governance problems
  • Choosing which concepts and skills from diplomacy, negotiation and/or lobbying are most relevant for specific professional contexts and problem-solving
  • Identifying appropriate information sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy, negotiation and lobbying
  • Creating meaningful research questions and research strategies to inform diplomatic practice
  • The linkages between academic scholarship and practitioner experience in the field
  • Research management and self-learning skills
  • Enhanced communication and negotiation skills
  • How to manage research, resource materials, data, referencing and research findings relating to all aspects of governance

Diplomatic Communication

This module is designed to introduce you to the theoretical approaches to the study of language and to develop your competence in effective diplomatic discourse and communication.

The module will cover: diplomatic language; genres and registers; diplomatic drafting; speech act theory; framing/reframing; persuasion; creative ambiguity; meta-communication; and speech analysis/writing.

Topics may include:

  • How to critically evaluate verbal and written diplomatic texts, norms and conventions
  • Analysing diplomatic discourses and diplomatic speech/speech-writing
  • The use of language choices in diplomatic exchanges and dialogue
  • Assessing diplomatic texts for argumentation and persuasion
  • Identifying appropriate sources of diplomatic language, speech and speech-writing and information handling
  • Formulating research questions and research strategies for studying diplomatic discourse
  • How to demonstrate excellent oral communication skills
  • Applying scholarship to communicate research findings to a practitioner audience
  • Demonstrating research management and self-learning skills, as well as enhanced communication and IT Skills
  • Managing research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomatic discourse and communication

Dissertation

The Dissertation module will equip you with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding to embark on your own research project.

Dissertation pathways may include:

  1. A desk-based research project that could be set by an organisation or a subject of your choice
  2. A project that involves collection of primary data from within an organisation or based on lab and/or field experiments
  3. A professional placement within an organisation during which time you will complete a project as part of your role, in agreement with the organisation (subject to a suitable placement position being obtained)

By undertaking a dissertation at master's level, you should achieve a high level of understanding in your chosen subject area and produce a written thesis or project report which will discuss your research in depth and with rigour.

Semester One

International Business and Trade

This module will cover: the role of international business and trade in the global system; emerging players and markets; trends in international business and trade; trade investments; exchange rates and exchange rate systems; the role of international institutions; FDI; the importance of diplomacy in promoting business and trade; the role of governments; and organising diplomatic and trade missions.
 
The aim of this module to introduce you to the international perspectives of business, to assess the complex relationship between international business and trade and diplomacy and to understand the role of governments, diplomacy and diplomatic missions in promoting business and trade. 
 
Topics studied may include:
  • The role of international business and trade
  • The relationship between international business and diplomacy
  • The role of governments and diplomatic missions in promoting business and trade
  • Key concepts and the practice of international business and trade
  • How to identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of international business and diplomacy
  • Formulating research questions and research strategies for the study of international business, diplomacy, governments and diplomatic missions

Peace-Building

This module will cover: historical evolution of peace-building; main institutions and actors involved in peace-building; competing theoretical and practitioner approaches to and frameworks of contemporary peace-building; key critiques of the Liberal peace-building model, and recent re-visions and advancements in scholarship and practice; and will cover a number of case studies.
 
The module aims to introduce, discuss and contrast orthodox and emancipatory approaches to the building of peace after war, via empirical case studies as a means of testing competing theories that explain the intervention, success and failure of contemporary (post-Cold War) peacebuilding. 
 
Topics studied may include:
  • The rise of Liberal peacebuilding
  • Key forces, processes and institutions involved in international peacebuilding
  • Competing and complementary critiques and advancements of post-liberal peace-building in scholarship and in practice
  • Conventional and critical frameworks of peace-building
  • The wider implications of success/failure on peace-building for global security and governance
  • Understanding the difference between orthodox and emancipatory peacebuilding
  • Evaluating literature and sources that critically examine Liberal peacebuilding
  • Applying competing theories of peace and conflict studies to contemporary cases
  • How to plan and execute tasks within a specific timescale and framework
  • Independent, critical thinking in problem-solving and analysis
  • How to engage in a debate and present complex ideas and sustained arguments clearly and fluently
  • Working in an independent and self-reliant manner
  • Deploying a range of IT skills that are common in the workplace

Political Risk in Emerging Markets

The module will ask the important question: what are Political Risks?

Together we will explore the lure of emerging markets; the political and economic geography of emerging markets; varieties of geopolitical risks; international political risks in the emerging markets; governance structures in emerging markets; lobbying; regulatory risks; and emerging markets as nodes in the global market.

This exciting module will outline the various dimensions of political risks that affect the business climate in emerging markets. On completion of the module, it is expected that you will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the various political risks in emerging markets; and be attuned to the politics of 'doing business' in emerging markets.

Topics studied as part of this module may include:

  • Political risks within emerging markets
  • The various factors that make emerging markets important nodes in international business activities
  • How to evaluate existing literature and understandings of emerging markets
  • Constructing reasoned arguments by synthesizing and analysing relevant information 
  • Reflecting on your own learning and making use of constructive feedback
  • Analysing current events and taking part in group discussions as part of an editorial meeting
  • Reviewing essay questions and planning possible outlines
  • Using communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information
  • Explaining events as they are reported in media coverage, and examining their contents

Semester Two

Global Economic Governance

The aim of this module to assess the validity of economic factors in international affairs and to understand the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance.

The module will cover: understanding the global economy; Global Governance and Global Economic Governance; The Workings of Global Governance; Issues and Challenges; The global financial system; The Challenges of Interdependence; Public Policy; Corporate Actions and the Global Economy; Diplomacy and Global Governance.

Topics studied may include:

  • The role of economic factors in international affairs
  • The development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance
  • The workings of global governance today
  • Concepts and the practice of global governance
  • Identifying appropriate sources pertaining to the study of the global economy and global governance
  • Building research questions and research strategies for the study of global governance
  • How to communicate research findings to a practitioner audience
  • Demonstrating research management and self-learning skills
  • How to manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of global economic governance

International Security

Critical evaluation of the changing landscape of international security; theories and approaches to the study of international security; emerging trends in contemporary issues and practices; examination and assessment of past and evolving cases of inter-state as well as intra-state security issues.
 
The aim of this module is to examine international security through a variety of traditional and non-traditional frames of reference. The overarching aim of the module is to provide students with a wider understanding of security as it has evolved historically, and the role it plays in contemporary societies and in global politics.
 
Topics studied may include:
  • Approaches to the study of international security
  • The causes of international insecurity
  • The utility of 'securitising' policy issues, and the impact of securitisation on public policy responses
  • The role and behaviours of international organisations and states in the international system
  • Understanding the merits of competing disciplinary, conceptual and theoretical perspectives 
  • Established and emergent phenomena in international security and in crises that impact on the international system
  • How to critically debate established and emergent security phenomena and crises
  • Key security concepts, and theories which contribute to the analysis of crises
  • How to present critiques of empirically grounded case study materials
  • Gathering and organising evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources
  • Working in small groups
  • Translating scholarship into practice

The BRICS and the Changing World Order

The module aims engage with different interpretations of power in world politics, drawing on various theories of international relations. This allows the module to probe into the rise of the BRICS in influencing power shifts in world politics. In broader terms, the module evaluates various policy consequences of emerging power shifts and the (potential) responses of the BRICS and the West.

Content studied may include topics such as: the rise of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa ("The BRICS") at the turn of the 21st century, and explore how their development has come to challenge the Western-led order in world politics. The module will focus on each of the five BRICS countries, and investigate how the evolution of their domestic and foreign policies has influenced their rise in world politics. An emphasis will be put on foreign policy and diplomacy, together with the tools, capabilities or resources employed by the BRICS in order to project their power in world politics.Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to: summarise and explain the main aspects of the rise of the BRICS since the beginning of the 1990s; identify appropriate sources pertaining to the BRICS and their external relations; and link and relate theoretical concepts from international relations and political economy to the empirical analysis of power in world politics, and particularly the role of the BRICS.

London as a Global City

The past twenty years has witnessed an unprecedented growth in global cities in both the developed and developing world. This module aims to introduce students to the politics, economics, society and international relations of London as the main case study through which to examine some of the key debates and controversies surrounding global cities and their place in the world.

Content studied may include topics such as: how to define global cities, the history of global cities, the social, infrastructure, economic and governance pressures facing global cities, the role of cities in international relations (for example, the concept of paradiplomacy) and the effect of Brexit on London. This course will allow students to understand the role of cities in global politics, not least their importance to the states that still shape international affairs. The course aims to allow students to better understand the global city they have chosen to study in.

On completion of this module students should be able to: summarise/explain the main aspects of a global city and how London fits or does not fit with these; identify appropriate sources pertaining to global cities, especially London; and link and relate theoretical concepts from international relations and political economy to the empirical analysis of London as a global city.

International Organisations

The aim of this module is to understand the functions, workings and practices of international organisations. As part of the module, you will explore:

  • What is an International Organisation (IO)?
  • What is an International Governmental Organisation (IGO) and what is an International Non-Governmental Organisation (INGO)?
  • What do IGOs do? What functions do they have? How effective are they? What is enforcement and compliance?

You will also look at international organisations in practice, studying organisations such as the UN Security Council, the European Union, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and Medecins Sans Frontieres. You will assess how they function, how they work in practice, how well they accomplish their goals, do they achieve results, and will gain an insight into the current challenges for these organisations.

Institutional Foundations of Capitalism and Entrepreneurship

By studying Institutional Foundations of Capitalism and Entrepreneurship, you will understand the nature the institutions that structure modern market economies. You will appreciate how key institutions interlock together to create circumstances for innovation, entrepreneurship and growth, alonside appreciating the importance of institutional analysis for economic and business policy-making.

This module aims to: provide students with an understanding of the institutions underlying modern market economies and of the institutional conditions that enable finance, innovation and entrepreneurship; introduce students to prominent multi-disciplinary approaches to the analysis of economic institutions; and introduce students to some key methods used for theoretical and empirical research in this area.

Topics studied may include:

  • The general nature of institutions and organisations and their role in modern market economies
  • Institutional features of property, markets, finance, corporations and states, and their functions in modern market economies
  • The diverse and uneven evolution of these institutions in different countries
  • Different approaches to the analysis of economic institutions
  • The drivers of economic and business activity in modern market economies
  • The key roles of different institutions in modern market economies
  • Different theoretical approaches in the area
  • Developing your capacity to undertake interdisciplinary research
  • How to critically evaluate theories and methods used to analyse economic and business activity

Diversity in Global Organisations

This module will address diversity management in multinational organisations. It will provide an understand the dimensions of diversity within organisations operating across borders and their implications for management of organisations, careers and teams. It will identify differences and complementarities between cultural and institutional framework. The module will teach students to assess the ways in which diversity affects micro-level managerial and team behaviour and to critically assess the extent to which approaches to diversity management are shaped by organisations and external forces. It will introduce debates and theories on how diversity and cross-cultural differences relate to corporate social responsibility and international human resource management practices and organisational performance.

Topics studied may include:

  • The theoretical frameworks underpinning diversity and inter-cultural management
  • The ways in which diversity shapes organisational behaviour at individual and group level, including leadership, motivation and team processes
  • How to identify the differences in formal and informal national institutions that shape diversity in global organisations and their implications for organisational policy and practice
  • The implications of diversity and cross-cultural management for corporate social responsibility and international human resource management
  • The implications, limitations and complementarity of key theories of diversity management
  • The challenges and opportunities associated with managing a diverse workforce with implications for organisational performance
  • Organisational practice and managerial behavior in diverse, cross-national contexts
  • The effectiveness of relevant national regulations and corporate codes of conduct
  • Recommendations for corporate policy

Media and Social Movements

Content studied may include: teaching on the theories on "new" media, global media systems, legal and governmental frameworks, surveillance, social-movement, alternative media practices, and transnational capitalism. It may also include: issues around media and social movements, by tracing the theoretical evolution of media and social movements, understanding media within broader social movements in historical processes rather than merely focusing on media technologies or impact media. The module seeks to cover topics on control of media systems on different regions of the world, alternative media practices, anti-imperial protest, non-aligned movements and media and national sovereignty.

On successful completion of the module, you should be able to: identify the theories and trends surrounding media and social movements; contextualise media within specific historical and political conditions; and interrogate media systems in different regions of the word and their connection to people’s democratic struggles.

Students must choose and complete one of the three optional modules in Semester One, and complete two of the eight optional modules in Semester Two to complete the MSc Diplomacy and International Governance.

How you'll be assessed

You will complete a combination of written and practical assessments, which may vary depending on the module choices you make. You can expect to complete essays and reports of varying lengths, as well as presentations, proposals and pitches in some cases. For information about the assessments you will be expected to complete for each module, please see the module lists for this programme.

How you'll study

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Independent study
  • Group work
  • Workshops

Your personal and professional development

Loughborough University London prides itself on the high calibre of graduates it produces, and provides great opportunities for you to develop the skills and attributes you need to progress successfully in your chosen career.

Future career prospects

Our Diplomacy and International Governance graduates will be equipped with the advanced skills and expertise needed to pursue a career in diplomacy, international relations, communication or another related field.

You will also have the opportunity to enhance your knowledge and career prospects by undertaking an MPhil or PhD programme. 

Your personal development

The Institute offers high-quality masters programmes taught by outstanding teaching staff and professionals that are well connected within their field. You will benefit from the guidance and tuition of an academic team with an unrivalled track record in the teaching of Diplomacy and other related disciplines. 

In addition, the careers and employability support on offer at Loughborough University London and has been carefully designed to give you the best possible chance of securing your dream role.

Loughborough University London is the first of its kind to develop a suite of careers-focused activities and support that is positioned as the underpinning of every student’s programme. Opportunities include employability assessments, group projects set by a real businesses and organisations, company site visits and organisation-based dissertation opportunities.

Entry requirements

Our entry requirements are listed using standard UK undergraduate degree classifications i.e. first-class honours, upper second-class honours and lower second-class honours. To learn the equivalent for your country, please choose it from the dropdown below.

Entry requirements for United Kingdom

A 2:2 honours degree (or equivalent international qualification) in a wide range of subjects.

Afghanistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Masters 95% 85% 70%

Albania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomë e Nivelit të Pare (First Level (University) Diploma (from 2010) 9.5 8.5 8

Algeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (4 year) / Diplome d'Inginieur d'Etat / Diplôme d'Etudes Supérieures 16 14 12

Argentina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Argentina 8.5 7.5 6.0

Armenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavri Kochum 90% 80% 70%
Magistrosi Kochum 3.9 3.5 3.0

Australia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Honours degree (AQF level 8) First Class, 80% Upper Second, 70%, H2A Lower Second, 60%, 2B
Ordinary degree - AQF Level 7 pass (mark 46 or 50) High Distinction (80% or 85%) Distinction (75% or 80%) Distinction (70% or 75%)

Austria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree/ Diplomstudium / Magister degree A (or 1.5) mit Auszeichnungbestanden 60% or B or 3.0 (or 2) 50% or C or 2.7 (or 3)

Azerbaijan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomu 4.5 4 3.5
Diplomu (Specialist Diploma) 90% 80% 70%

Bahamas

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bahrain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Bangladesh

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BUET or 'Good Private' University - 4 year degree BUET - 1st (70%) / 3.5 BUET - 2nd (60%) / 3.0 BUET - 2nd (55%) / 2.75
Other universities - Masters (1-2 years) following a 3 or 4 year degree 80% / 4.0 65% / 3.25 50% / 2.5

Barbados

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Barbados - Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Belarus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Specialist Diploma (5Yr) 9 7 5

Belgium

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude 60%/12
Licenciaat 80% 70% 60%
Licencie 17 14 12

Belize

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Benin

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise 18 15 or Bien 12 or Assez Bien

Bermuda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bolivia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
A Licenciado, 4 years Private (public/private) 85/78 75/66 67/55

Bosnia and Herzegovina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma Visokog Obrazovanja / Diplomirani 10 9 8

Botswana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's degree A or 80% B or 70% C or 60%

Brazil

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brazil - 4 yr Bacharel or Licenciado/Licenciatura or Título Profissional 8.5 (A) 7.5 6.0

Brunei

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brunei First Upper Second (60%/B/3.1) Lower Second (50%/C/2.7)

Bulgaria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 yr Diploma za Zavarsheno Visshe Obrazovanie (Diploma of Completed Higher Education) 6 5 4

Cambodia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 years 90% or 9 or 4.0 80% or 8 or 3.5 70% or 7 or 3.0

Cameroon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree or Diplome d'Etudes Superiures de Commerce 1st or 15 2:1 or 14 2:2 or 12.5
Diplome d'Ingenieur or Diplôme d'Ingénieur de Conception or a Maitrise or a 4 year Licence 20 or GPA 3.7 20 or Bien (GPA 3.4) 20 or Assez Bien (GPA 3.1)

Canada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0/percentage scale 3.7/85% 3.3/75% 2.7/68%
Out of 9 8 6 5
Out of 12 10 8 6

Chile

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Grado de Licenciado / Título (Profesional) de [subject area] (4 years) 6 5.5 5

China

Students are required to have a bachelor degree (4 years) for entry to a postgraduate programme. The University uses the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities to identify the required final mark, as outlined on the table below:

First class (70%) Mid 2:1 (65%) 2:1 (60%) Mid 2:2 (55%) 2:2 (50%)
Shanghai Rank Top 250 85% 81% 80% 78% 77%
Shanghai Rank 251-500 89% 84% 83% 81% 80%
Shanghai Rank 501+ 92% 87% 86% 85% 82%

Affiliated colleges

The University will consider students from Affiliated Colleges in the following way:

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities in the top 250 Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 80%-84%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are 251-500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are above 500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered as follows:

  • School of Business and Economics: not considered
  • All other programmes if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Universities given special consideration

Applicants from a small number of Chinese universities that specialise in business, management, finance or creative arts will be given special consideration by the University. The full list of these universities and the Shanghai band under which they will be considered can be found in the PDF below.

Download the list of Chinese universities given special consideration here

Students who do not meet the above requirements may occasionally be considered if they have a relevant degree, can show good grades in relevant subjects, and/or have substantial relevant work experience.

Colombia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 4.5 3.75 3.2

Costa Rica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado 9 8 or 80 7 or 75

Croatia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaureus / Prvostupnik 4.5 3.8 3.0

Cuba

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year Titulo de Licenciado / Licenciatura 5 4 3

Cyprus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cyprus 8.5 7.0 6.5

Czech Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalár (after 2001) 6 yr integrated Magistr 1 1.5 2

Denmark

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Candidatus/Candidata Magisterii or Bachelor degree (7 point scale) 12 10 7

Dominican Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciado 3.8 Magna Cum Laude 3.5 Cum Laude 3.2
Título de [subject area] - 85% 82%

Ecuador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado 8.5 8 7
Título de [subject area] 85% 80% 70%

Egypt

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Egypt 3.5 3.2 2.8
Universities only BA 90%, BSc 85% BA 80%, BSc 75% BA 65%, BSc 65%

El Salvador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Licenciado 8.5 7.5 6.5
Título de Ingeniero 85% 75% 65%
Arquitecto - Muy Bueno Bueno

Estonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalaureusekraad or Magister or Magistrikraad 5 or A 4 or B 3 or C

Ethiopia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A/GPA 4.0 A/GPA 3.5 B/GPA 2.8

Finland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kandidaattii/Kandidat (out of 3) 3 2 1
Maisteri/Magister (out of 5) 4.5 3 2.5

France

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (3 years)/ Maitrise/ Diplôme d'Ingénieur 14 12 11

Georgia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year degree (% = new system) 5 (95%) 4.5 (85%) 4 (75%)

Germany

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
German Bachelor/ Diplom, Magister Artium / Zeugnis über den Zweiten Abschnitt der Ärztlichen Prüfung 1.5 2.5 3.0

Ghana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ghana First Upper second/60% Lower second/50%

Greece

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
AEI 8.5 7.0 6
TEI 8.5 7 6.5

Grenada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of West Indies - classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Degree from University of West Indies - grade / percentage A B / 75% C / 55%
Degree from University of West Indies - GPA 3.6 3.0 2.0

Guatemala

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Liceniado / Titulo de (subject area) - 4years 90% (public university) / 95% (private university) 80% (public university) / 85% (private university) 60% (public university) / 70% (private university)

Guyana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's GPA 4 GPA 3.5 3.0

Honduras

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado / Grado Académico de Licenciatura (4 year degree) - GPA out of 5 GPA 5 or 90% GPA 4 or 80% GPA 3.5 or 70%

Hong Kong

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Hungary

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Alapfokozt or Egyetemi Oklevel / Bachelor 5 4 3

Iceland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaurreatus degree or Kandidatsprof/Candidatus Mag 8.5 7.5 6.5

India

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Institutions listed on the Indian Ranking of Higher Educational Institutions Framework 65% (First) 60% (First) 55% (Upper second)
All other Indian institutions 70% (First with distinction) 65% (First) 60% (First)

Indonesia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sarjana I (S1) from A (or B) credited Universities 3.7 (4.0) 3.3 (3.7) 3 (3.3)

Iran

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iran 17 15 13

Iraq

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iraq 80% 75% 70%

Ireland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Republic of Ireland First (70%) Upper second (60%) Lower second (50%)

Israel

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3 yr Bachelor Degree 90% 80% 70%

Italy

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma di Laurea 109/110 104/110 (or 27) 100/110 (or 26)

Ivory Coast

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplome d'Etude Approfondies, Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures 16 14 (Bien) 12 (Assez Bien)

Jamaica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by UCJ and CCCJ 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) or B 2:2 (GPA 2.0) or C

Japan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Japan 85% 80% or B or 3.0 70% or C or 2.0

Jordan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3 or 3.5/5 or 75% 2.8 or 65%

Kazakhstan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 5.0/percentage scale 4.5 or 90% 4 or 85% 3.5 or 80%
GPA 4.33 scale 3.9 3.7 3.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.4 3

Kenya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kenya First / 70% / A Upper second / 60% / B Lower second / 50% / C

Kosovo

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kosovo 10 9 8

Kuwait

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.6 3.0 2.8

Latvia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Latvia 9 7 6

Lebanon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
American 90% (3.5) 80% (3.2) 70% (2.8)
French 18 15 12

Liberia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's 4.0 or 90% 3.5 or 85% 3 or 80%

Libya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BSc Engineering, Architecture, Medicine 85 (3.6) 75 (3.0) 65 (2.5)
Other bachelor's degree from a university 90 (4.0) 85% (3.6) 75% (3.0)

Lithuania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lithuania 9 8 7

Macau

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macau 1st or GPA 3.7 2:1 or GPA 3.0 2:2 or GPA 2.5

Macedonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macedonia 10 9 8

Malawi

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's only MSc 75% MSc 70% MSc 65%

Malaysia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Class 2.1 2.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Malta

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Malta 1st (80%) 2:1 (70%) 2:2 (55%)

Mauritius

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mauritius 1st or 70% 2:1 or 60% 2:2 or 50%

Mexico

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mexico 9 8 7

Moldova

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenţă (Diploma of Licentiate) 10 9 8

Mongolia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Диплом Специалиста (Specialist Diploma) 90% or 3.5 80% or GPA 3.2 70% or GPA 3.0

Morocco

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Morocco 17 15 13

Mozambique

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciatura 16 14 12

Myanmar (Burma)

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
2 year Master's degree 5 or 85% 5 or 75% 4.5 or 65%

Namibia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Namibia 80% or A 70% or B 60% or C

Nepal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's (after 3 year bachelor degree) 90% or 3.9 GPA 80% or 3.8 GPA 65% or 3.3 GPA

Netherlands

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Netherlands 8 7 6

New Zealand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Honours degree (480 credits) - Level 8 First (7.0) Upper Second (6.0) Lower Second (4.0)

Nicaragua

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciatura (4 year) 90% 80% 70%

Nigeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
7 point Scale 6 5 4
5 point scale 4.5 3.8 3.5
4 point scale 3.5 3 2.5

Norway

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Norway A B C

Oman

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Pakistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Public Universities 4 Year degree only First with distinction (75%) / 4.0 First (65%) / 3.2 Second (59%) / 2.6
Private Universities 4 Year degree only First with Distinction (85%) First (75%) First (65%)
2 or 3 year bachelor's plus Master's First (60%) Second (55%) Second (50%)

Palestine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree A / 90% / 3.7 B+ / 85% / 3.3 B / 80% / 3.0

Panama

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 91 (A) 81 (B) 71 (C)

Papua New Guinea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Papua New Guinea 1st 2:1 2:2

Paraguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Paraguay - 4 3.5

Peru

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Título de Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 14 13 12

Philippines

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from prestigious state universities or Centres of Excellence (COE) Summa Cum Laude 4.0 / 96% / 1.0 Magna cum Laude 3.5 / 92% / 1.5 Cum Laude 3.0 / 87%/ 2.0

Poland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree (post 2003) Magister (pre- 2003) 5 4.5 / 4+ 4

Portugal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Portugal 18 16 14

Qatar

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Romania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenta/ Diploma de Inginer 9 8 7

Russia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Russia 4.5 4.0 3.5

Rwanda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year bachelor (Hons) degree (480 credits) 1st, 16/20 (80%) 2:1,14/20 (70%) 2:2, 12/20 (60%)

Saudi Arabia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.75 3.5

Senegal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise, Diplome d'Etude Approfondies,Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures Specialisees 16/20 or Tres Bien 14/20 or Bien 12/20 or Assez Bien

Serbia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomirani/ Bachelor's degree 9 8 7

Sierra Leone

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification - 2:1 2:2
Percentage grading - 60-69% 50-59%
Letter grading - B+ B

Singapore

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Upper second Lower second
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.0 2.7
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.5 3.0

Slovakia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovakia 1.5 or B 2.0 or C 2.5 or C/high D

Slovenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovenia 9.5 8.5 7

South Africa

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Percentage scale 75-100% 70-74% 60-69%

South Korea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA out of 4.5 4.0 / A 3.5 / B 3.0 / C+
GPA out of 4.3 4.0 / A 3.0 / B 2.7 / C+

Spain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de Ingeniero / Título de Arquitecto 8.5 7 6.5
UCM grading 3.0 2.0 1.5

Sri Lanka

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sri Lanka 70% 60% 55%

Sudan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sudan (North and South) 1st or 70% or B+ 2:1 or 66% Mid 2:2 or 60% or B

Sweden

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sweden - Overall grade of VG with a minimum of 90 credits at VG Overall grade of G with a minimum of 90 credits at G

Switzerland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Switzerland 6 5 4

Syria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
State universities 4 years of study 80% 70% 60%
Private universities 4 years of study 90% 80% 70%

Taiwan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Category 1 (4 year degree) 80% 75% 70%
Category 2 (4 year degree) 85% 80% 75%

Tajikistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tajikistan - 4.5 4

Tanzania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tanzania 1st 2:1 2:2

Thailand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Trinidad and Tobago

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by ACTT 1st or B+ or 70% 2:1 or B or 65% 2:2 or B- or 60%

Tunisia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence, Maîtrise, Diplôme National d'Ingénieu 15 (tres bien) 14 (bien) 11 (assez bien)

Turkey

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lisans Diplomasi or a Műhendis Diplomasi 3.5 3 2.5

Turkmenistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Turkmenistan - 4.5 4

Uganda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Uganda 1st or 4.4 2:1 or 3.8 2:2 or 3.0

Ukraine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Dyplom Magistra or a Bachelors degree (11 / 5) 11 or 5 9 or 4.5 8 or 4

United Arab Emirates

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.6

United States of America

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Uruguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado (4 year) 10 9 8

Uzbekistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomi / Diplomi (Specialist Diploma) 90% or GPA 4.5 80% or GPA 4.0 70% or GPA 3.0

Venezuela

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado/Professional title. (4 year) 18/20 or 8/9 16/20 or 7/9 14/20 or 6/9

Vietnam

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Vietnam 8.0 7.0 6.0

Zambia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A or 4.0 or 80% B+, 3.5 or 70% B or 3.0 or 60%

Zimbabwe

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3/4 year degree 1st or 75% 2:1 or 65% 2:2 or 60%

English language requirements

Applicants must meet the minimum English Language requirements. Further details are available on the International website.

The standard University IELTS English language requirement is 6.5 overall with 6.0 in each individual element (reading, writing, listening and speaking).

Fees and funding

UK / EU fee

Full-time degree per annum
£10,900

International fee

Full-time degree per annum
£19,600

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment.

The fee stated is for a full-time student undertaking a master’s programme of 180 credits. Part-time students should divide the published fee by 180 credits and then multiply by the number of credits they are taking to calculate their tuition fees.

Find out more about master's degree funding