Preparing for semester one

The transition from undergraduate to postgraduate can be a daunting prospect for some applicants. To ease the process, we have devised a series of helpful guidelines and non-compulsory activities to prepare you for the best possible start to your studies.

Postgraduate-level teaching: what to expect

As a postgraduate student, you will be expected to undertake more self-directed, independent learning. You will be required to think for yourself and develop critical reading and writing. This means having the ability to assess whether an argument is coherent and well supported by evidence. 
 
You should express your ideas and opinions in your own words, both in class and in your assignments. Memorising and recalling large amounts of information will be less important than building critical arguments.
 
Plagiarism is treated very seriously at Loughborough University London. Plagiarism is the term used to describe the use of else’s words or ideas in your own work, without adequately acknowledging or referencing the source. You can plagiarise by quoting (using the exact words of another source) or paraphrasing (putting the ideas of another source into your own words).  
 
Penalties for plagiarism can be very severe; you could fail a module or your entire course. This attitude towards plagiarism may be different from what you are used to, so make sure that you are familiar with how to quote and paraphrase correctly when including references in your work.

Block teaching 

At Loughborough University London, many of our modules are taught in short, 3-week bursts rather than over a full semester. This is an intensive way of learning which encourages you to become immersed into a topic for a short period of time. 
 
Unlike traditional University teaching, which is paced through the course of a semester, you will avoid the distraction of multiple modules running in parallel and will be able to focus all of your efforts into a much smaller range of topics.
 
If you are studying full-time, it is likely that your timetable will allocate approximately three lectures per module per week, with each module being accompanied by a regular tutorial or seminar session. If you are studying part-time, you can find out how many hours you are likely to be in class per week by emailing london-enquiries@lboro.ac.uk.

 

Action-based learning

Action-based learning is a key component of every module at Loughborough University London and is a core part of the Collaborative Project module, which is studied by all full-time master's students during semester one. You will work with students from a range of disciplines for the duration of the semester, and will explore innovative and creative solutions to a brief, which is supplied by a real business or organisation.
 
By engaging with students from a range of backgrounds and by working in partnership with a real business or organisation, you will develop a broad range of advanced problem-solving, communication and team-working skills. To best prepare for this exciting module, take a look through some of last year's collaborative projects

Preparing for your programme

You will be expected to take an active part in live discussions and activities from day one. Your academic faculty will encourage you to challenge yourself, ask questions and engage with your peers in order to progress your understanding to a much deeper level. 
 
Your lectures and tutorials are formatted so that you can put forward new ideas, raise issues and interact with the teaching in a stimulating and supportive environment. Before your studies begin, you may wish to browse through the recommended readings below, which aim to prepare you for the start of term.

Design Innovation programmes

Design Innovation MA/MSc

 

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Beckman, S. L., & Barry, M. (2007) Innovation as a learning process: Embedding design thinking. California management review50(1), 25-56.

 

To best prepare for this programme, we recommend purchasing the following text books:

Holliday, A., Hyde, M., & Kullman, J. (2016). Inter-Cultural Communication: An Advanced Resource Book (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.

Liedtka, J., & Ogilvie, T. (2011). Designing for Growth: a design thinking tool kit for managers. Columbia University Press, New York.

 

Entrepreneurial Design Management MSc

 

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Beckman, S. L., & Barry, M. (2007) Innovation as a learning process: Embedding design thinking. California management review50(1), 25-56.

 

To best prepare for this programme, we recommend purchasing the following text books:

Holliday, A., Hyde, M., & Kullman, J. (2016). Inter-Cultural Communication: An Advanced Resource Book (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.

Liedtka, J., & Ogilvie, T. (2011). Designing for Growth: a design thinking tool kit for managers. Columbia University Press, New York.

 

Design and Culture MA

 

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Holliday, A. (1999) Small cultures, Applied linguistics, 20(2), 237-264.

To best prepare for this programme, we recommend purchasing the following text book:

Holliday, A., Hyde, M., & Kullman, J. (2016). Inter-Cultural Communication: An Advanced Resource Book (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.

 

 

Design Innovation Management MSc

 

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Beckman, S. L., & Barry, M. (2007) Innovation as a learning process: Embedding design thinking. California management review50(1), 25-56.

 

To best prepare for this programme, we recommend purchasing the following text book:

Liedtka, J., & Ogilvie, T. (2011). Designing for Growth: a design thinking tool kit for managers. Columbia University Press, New York.

Digital Technologies programmes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for these programmes, please see the following article:

L’heureux, A., et al. (2017). Machine learning with big data: Challenges and approaches. IEEE Access5, 7776-7797.

Diplomacy and International Governance programmes

Diplomacy and International Governance MRes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Adler-Nissen, R., Galpin, C., & Rosamond, B. (2017). Performing Brexit: How a post-Brexit world is imagined outside the United Kingdom. The British Journal of Politics and International Relations19(3), 573-591

Diplomacy, Business and Trade MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Gilboa, E. (2008). Searching for a theory of public diplomacy. The annals of the American academy of political and social science, 616(1), 55-77

Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Adler-Nissen, R., Galpin, C., & Rosamond, B. (2017). Performing Brexit: How a post-Brexit world is imagined outside the United Kingdom. The British Journal of Politics and International Relations19(3), 573-591

Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Ratner, S. R. (1997). Peacebuilding and the Limits of Liberal Internationalism. International Security, 22(2), 54-89

Innovation and Entrepreneurship programmes

Entrepreneurship and Innovation MRes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Lawson, B., & Samson, D. (2001). Developing innovation capability in organisations: a dynamic capabilities approach. International journal of innovation management5(3), 377-400

 

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Lawson, B., & Samson, D. (2001). Developing innovation capability in organisations: a dynamic capabilities approach. International journal of innovation management5(3), 377-400.

 

Entrepreneurship, Finance and Innovation MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Mollick, E. (2014). The dynamics of crowdfunding: An exploratory study. Journal of business venturing, 29(1), 1-16.

 

Managing Innovation in Creative Organisations MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Wilson, N. C., & Stokes, D. (2005). Managing creativity and innovation: The challenge for cultural entrepreneurs. Journal of small business and enterprise development12(3), 366-378.

International Management programmes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this programme, please see the following articles:

S. Fainshmidt, et al (2006) Journal of World Business

Young, N., et al (2008) Journal of Management Studies

 

Media and Creative Industries programmes

Communication and Cultural Policy MA

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article

Garnham, N. (2005). From cultural to creative industries: An analysis of the implications of the “creative industries” approach to arts and media policy making in the United Kingdom. International journal of cultural policy11(1), 15-29.

Global Communication and Development MA

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

DiMaggio, P., Hargittai, E., Neuman, W. R., & Robinson, J. P. (2001). Social implications of the Internet. Annual review of sociology27(1), 307-336.

Media and Creative Industries MA

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

DiMaggio, P., Hargittai, E., Neuman, W. R., & Robinson, J. P. (2001). Social implications of the Internet. Annual review of sociology27(1), 307-336.

Media and Creative Industries MRes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

DiMaggio, P., Hargittai, E., Neuman, W. R., & Robinson, J. P. (2001). Social implications of the Internet. Annual review of sociology27(1), 307-336.

Sport Business programmes

Sport Business MRes

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Ratten, V. (2011). Sport-based entrepreneurship: towards a new theory of entrepreneurship and sport management. International entrepreneurship and management journal7(1), 57-69

 

Sport Business and Innovation MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Ratten, V. (2011). Sport-based entrepreneurship: towards a new theory of entrepreneurship and sport management. International entrepreneurship and management journal7(1), 57-69

 

Sport Business and Leadership MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Arnold, R., Fletcher, D., & Molyneux, L. (2012). Performance leadership and management in elite sport: recommendations, advice and suggestions from national performance directors. European sport management quarterly12(4), 317-336

 

Sport Digital and Media Technologies MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Gantz, W., & Lewis, N. (2014). Sports on traditional and newer digital media: Is there really a fight for fans?. Television & New Media15(8), 760-768

 

Sport Marketing MSc

To get an idea of the level of reading required for this course please see the following article:

Ratten, V., & Ratten, H. (2011). International sport marketing: practical and future research implications. Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing26(8), 614-620.

Supporting you

 
The academic faculty, professional services team and LSU London will provide you with a strong support network to help you through every step of your postgraduate journey.
 
For more information about the range of support services available to you, please see our student support pages.