Programme information

Our MA in Global Communication and Development will develop your understanding of communications and development in a changing global context, with a particular focus on the Global South.
 
In our Global Communication and Development programme you will consider major traditions, theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to the analysis of global communications and development.
 
Through a series of insightful lectures and seminars, you will investigate the social, economic, political and historical character of global communications and development and learn new communication infrastructures, tools and media practices.
 
Our Global Communication and Development MA will develop your critical understanding of how the media and creative industries work, along with insights into broader economic, social, and political issues. For example, you will reflect on the impact of the digital age and information capitalism on the Global South, which incorporates communities across Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Entry requirements

An honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent overseas qualification in a social sciences, humanities or associated subject.

Overseas qualification equivalencies

English Language requirements

All applicants for admission to Loughborough University must have a qualification in English Language before they can be admitted to any course or programme, whether their first language is English or not.

More on the Loughborough University website

Fees and funding

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. The standard tuition fees for 2018/19 are:

  • £10,250 (UK/EU)
  • £17,500 (International)

University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment. Special arrangements are made for payments by part-time students.

View scholarships for 2018 entry

Programme aims

  • Gain a systematic and critical understanding of communications and development in a changing global context
  • Critically analyse current research and advanced scholarship about globalisation, communications and development with a particular focus on the Global South
  • Develop skills and competencies in a comprehensive range of research methods and techniques relevant to the investigation of communication practices as well as development policies in different socio-technical contexts
  • Interpret, evaluate and apply advanced knowledge of communications and development in an innovative way
  • Prepare for employment in diverse professional environments through a combination of independent work and industry exposure

Programme modules

This programme covers a wide range of topics; to give you a taster we have expanded on some of the modules affiliated with this programme and the specific assessment methods associated with each module.

To complete our MA Global Communication and Development programme, you must choose and complete four core modules and four optional modules.

*All students must choose at least one of the following optional modules: Media & Popular Culture in Latin America, Communication and Politics in North Africa and the Middle East, or Media Cultures of South Asia.

Core modules

Collaborative Project

With a multi-talented group of students, you will work on a brief from a real company looking to solve a real social or business problem.
 
Together with your student team, you will research and build solutions to a business problem, supported by our project tutors, clients and staff. Previous clients include Foster + Partners, Speedo, The London Legacy Development Corporation as well as many other companies, start-ups and charities.
 
The Collaborative Project provides a means for you to engage in critical enquiry and to be exposed to project-based teamwork in multicultural and interdisciplinary settings. By undertaking this module, you will strengthen your cooperative and collaborative working skills and competencies, whilst raising your awareness and appreciation of cultural and disciplinary diversity and differences.
 
The Collaborative Project aims to provide you with a hands-on experience of identifying, framing and resolving practice-oriented and real-world based challenges and problems, using creativity and appropriate tools to achieve valuable and relevant solutions. Alongside the collaborative elements of the module, you will be provided with opportunities to network with stakeholders, organisations and corporations, which will give you the experience and skills needed to connect to relevant parties and potentially develop future employment opportunities.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module, you will be able to:
 
  • Work effectively in diverse and interdisciplinary teams;
  • Undertake and contribute towards a project-based development process;
  • Apply critical enquiry, reflection, and creative methods to identify, frame, and resolve issues and problems at hand;
  • Identify user and stakeholder needs and value creation opportunities, whilst collecting and applying evidence-based information and knowledge to develop appropriate insights, practices and solutions;
  • Identify, structure, reflect on key issues and propose solutions to problems in creative ways;
  • Enhance your appreciation for diversity and divergent individual and disciplinary perspectives;
  • Be able to provide structured, reflective and critical feedback to peers and other stakeholders;
  • Plan and execute a project plan including scope, resources and timing;
  • Effectively communicate ideas, methods and results to a diverse range of stakeholders;
  • Use multiple, state-of-the-art date media and technologies to communicate with collaborators;
  • Make informed, critical and reflective decisions in time-limited situations.
 
Assessment
100% Coursework consisting of:
 
  • 20% Group project proposal
  • 20% Individual reflection
  • 30% Final Project Report
  • 30% Project deliverables to the client

Critical Studies of Globalisation, Communication and Social Change

This module aims to introduce a critical perspective on the role of media and communication in a globalized and changing world. Theories of social change will be explored from the perspective of media and communication, including the place of traditional and new media technologies. Case studies will be used to illustrate a range of approaches to understanding and intervening in social change – including grassroots and emergent citizen led and top down and instrumental UN examples.
 
Dominant ideas of globalization and development will be explored, and contrasted with experiences of people from the Global South to enable you to explore broader debates on media, communication and social change. The role of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in development and the ‘digital divide’ will be examined. The module will draw all of this together to explore ways in which media and communication can play a role in global initiatives such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals, particularly their emphasis on social accountability.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • Concepts, debates and case studies related to globalization, media, communication and social change
  • A selected range of critical concepts with application to the analysis of media and communication in a globalized and changing world
  • The impact of media and communication on practices and experiences of social change and their role in the global development agenda
 
Assessment
  • Group presentation (20%)
  • Essay (80%)

Media and Social Movements

The module content will include: Theories on "new" media, global media systems, legal and governmental frameworks, surveillance, social-movement, alternative media practices, transnational capitalism.
 
The module introduces the issues around media and social movements, by tracing the theoretical evolution of media and social movements, understanding media within broader social movements in historical processes rather than merely focusing on media technologies or impact media. The model seeks to cover topics on control of media systems on different regions of the world, alternative media practices, anti-imperial protest, non-aligned movements and media and national sovereignty.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • Analyse and identify theories and trends about media and social movements;
  • Contextualise media within specific historical and political conditions;
  • Interrogate media’s systems in different regions of the word and its connection to people’s democratic struggles;
  • Understand debates around new information technologies including social media and their relation to social change;
  • How the media systems are organized and structured;
  • The links between current environmental and social issues and media technologies;
  • Importance of media in geopolitical conflicts;
  • Identify and evaluate alternative media systems;
  • Assess material gathered from a range of academic and non-academic sources in order to develop a critical understanding of theories and practices;
  • Use material presented in teaching sessions, along with other sources, to produce an in-depth evaluation of an existing research study;
  • Evaluate methodologies used in academic research to develop new research questions or hypotheses for investigation;
  • Use critical perspectives to analyse emerging trends in media and social movements;
  • Design, implement and evaluate an original study in a topic relevant to the field;
  • Engage with major thinkers, debates and intellectual paradigms within the fields of media, communication and culture, critiquing and synthesising the insights gained in their own analytical work;
  • Analyse new and emerging trends and interrogate both common sense understanding and received wisdom in relevant areas of inquiry;
  • Discuss and evaluate transformations in digital media and their social, political, economic and cultural contexts and wield this understanding in appraising current patterns of development, such as cultural globalisation and media convergence;
  • Discuss their self-designed research and the issues it raises reflexively;
  • Gather, process, analyse and evaluate primary data;
  • Locate and critique relevant academic and non-academic sources;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Understand the impact of digital media on culture;
  • Understand emerging trends in digital media;
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field;
  • Be able to plan, organise and manage coursework assignments, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.
 
Assessment
 100% Coursework consisting of:
 
  • 30% Report
  • 70% Essay

Researching Media Industries

This module will include teaching on topics such as:
 
  • Approaches to media and creative industries research;
  • Standardised questionnaire design;
  • Methods of sampling
  • Document-based research;
  • Conducting qualitative interviews;
  • Analysing quantitative data using SPSS;
  • Analysing qualitative data through thematic analysis;
  • Developing multi method research strategies.
  • The aim of this module is to become familiar with a range of methodologies for the analysis of structure, operation and output of media and cultural industries.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module you should be able to:
 
  • Analyse a range of methods applicable to the study of media and creative industries, cultural texts and reception;
  • Situate particular social, textual and industry research methods in relation to other research practices;
  • Show through explanation and/or discussion the tensions that divide particular research methods and the benefits that can be derived from their combination;
  • Evaluate qualitative and quantitative data to appraise their wider analytical value and significance;
  • Link empirical findings to wider theoretical debates concerning creative industries, media production and reception;
  • Understand how to collect primary data;
  • Understand how to analyse data;
  • Know how to find and evaluate scholarly sources;
  • Be able to communicate effectively in speech and writing;
  • Synthesise scholarly and primary sources for use in argument;
  • Understand the relevance of research to media and creative industries;
  • Be able to conduct primary research relevant to media and creative industries;
  • Skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field (e.g. report writing);
  • Be able to plan, organise and manage a self-directed piece of research, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.
 
Assessment
  • 100% Coursework

Dissertation

The Dissertation module will equip you with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding to embark on your own research project. You will have the choice of three dissertation pathways:
 
  • A desk based research project that could be set by an organisation or could be a subject of the student's choice
  • A project that involves collection of primary data from within an organisation or based on lab and/or field experiments
  • An Internship within an organisation during which time students will complete a project as part of their role in agreement with the organisation (subject to a suitable placement position being obtained)
  • By undertaking a dissertation at master's level, you will achieve a high level of understanding in your chosen subject area and will produce a written thesis or project report which will discuss your research in more detail.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • The importance of project planning;
  • The importance of a clear hypothesis or research question;
  • The ethical implications of research;
  • The relevant empirical data and methodologies for data collection or knowledge assimilation for the subject area;
  • Methods of data analysis and their suitability for the intended data;
  • The areas of expertise or publications of the major individuals or organisations in the subject or business area;
  • The previous research or current knowledge in the specific subject or business area;
  • Theoretical perspectives relevant to your chosen topic;
  • The most effective methods of presentation for data or knowledge;
  • Developing a clear, coherent and original research question, hypothesis or business problem in a suitable subject area;
  • Synthesising relevant sources (e.g. research literature, primary data) to construct a coherent argument in response to your research question, hypothesis or business problem;
  • Analysing primary or secondary data collected by an appropriate method;
  • Critically evaluating data collected in context with previously published knowledge or information;
  • Engaging in critical debate and argumentation in written work;
  • Applying principles of good scholarly practice to your written work;
  • Performing appropriate literature searching/business information searching using library databases or other reputable sources;
  • Planning a research project and producing a realistic gantt chart demonstrating your intended timelines;
  • Synthesising information from appropriate sources;
  • Demonstrating rational use of research method tools;
  • Selecting and using appropriate investigative and research skills;
  • Demonstrating effective project planning skills;
  • Finding and evaluating scholarly sources;
  • Engaging in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Demonstrating effective report writing skills;
  • Recognising and using resources effectively;
  • Successfully managing a project from idea to completion;
  • Demonstrating commercial awareness or the impact of knowledge transfer in a business or research environment.
 
Assessment
100% Coursework consisting of:
 
  • 20% Literature review
  • 20% Research proposal
  • 60% Dissertation report/essay

Optional modules

Media & Popular Culture in Latin America

The aim of this module is to examine the relationship of media and popular culture in Latin America and its impact in the rest of the world. This relationship between media and popular culture is deeply intertwined in processes of nation formation and global circuits of cultural production, which have become central forces of structural changes in Latin American society. The module will also look at the intersections of media and popular culture in connection with other historical processes like urbanization in the twentieth century, industrialization of nation states, and the social imaginaries created around them.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • The role of media and popular culture in Latin America
  • Concepts, debates and case studies related to popular culture and media in Latin America
  • The impact of Latin American media productions in global circuits
  • The relationship between popular culture, media and nation-states in Latin America
 
Assessment 
  • Essay (70%)
  • Presentation (30%)

Communication and Politics in North Africa and the Middle East

This module will provide you with a thematic and historical introduction to the emergence and usage of communications infrastructure and the media in North Africa and the Middle East. The main goal is to teach you about critical thought about culture, communications, the media, and politics in contemporary North Africa and the Middle East. The module will expose you to a wide range of technological practices, political struggles over communication lines and communication policies that have emerged in these regions.
 
North Africa and the Middle East are diverse in terms of ethnicity, religion, language and historical problems, as are their communications and media histories and practices. The module aims to give you a sense of how and why communications technologies (as infrastructures, tools, and social practices) have altered and/or influenced political and social organisations of life for different agents of society across these areas. The module considers the role of communications technologies in relation to the socio-political landscape of the region, by covering a broad range of tools from telegraphy in colonial times to the smart telephony of neo-liberal capitalism.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • The core dynamics of the relationship between communications and politics in North Africa and the Middle East
  • The prevailing theoretical and policy-oriented discussions of media and communication technologies in North Africa and the Middle East
  • The main concepts and theoretical perspectives for understanding communications and politics in the Global South
 
Assessment
  • Reading report (40%)
  • Essay (60%)

Media Cultures of South Asia

Our Media cultures of South Asia module covers a broad range of topics relating to media and socio-cultural practices in South Asia. In conjunction with the rise of South Asia as an important centre of global commerce and politics it has also developed a vibrant popular culture industry over the past several decades with enthusiastic consumers across the world.
 
This module examines the development and academic significance of various forms of popular culture from multidisciplinary perspectives and in South Asian contexts including India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Nepal and Bhutan. In this topical and theoretical module, you will explore those forms of South Asian media cultures that have drawn scholarly attention including:
 
  • Cinema and television drama;
  • Fashion and celebrity;
  • Pop music and advertising;
  • Folk and street culture;
  • Gender and Sexuality;
  • Cyberculture.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, you should be able to:
 
  • Develop a critical understanding of the main theoretical approaches and trends for exploring South Asian Media Cultures;
  • Critically evaluate the role of media in contemporary South Asia;
  • Critically evaluate the significance of South Asian media within a global discourse;
  • Articulate concepts, debates and case studies related to media culture in South Asia;
  • Show an application of critical concepts to the analysis of popular culture in South Asia;
  • Demonstrate the impact of South Asian media cultures in a global perspective;
  • Appraise and assess critical perspectives to analyse emerging trends in South Asian media;
  • Demonstrate a depth of critical and analytical thinking in relation to South Asian media cultures;
  • Critically evaluate complex problems and apply reasoned thinking and ideas;
  • Engage with key scholarship in media and cultural studies of South Asia;
  • Analyse how South Asian media is produced, represented and consumed;
  • Evaluate the academic significance of studying South Asia as a global region;
  • Critically assess South Asian media cultures within the context of a global media discourse.
 
Assessment
100% coursework consisting of:
 
  • 80% Essay
  • 20% Group Presentation

Network Information and Communications Policy

The module aims to bring together critical perspectives in the rapidly changing areas of national, regional and transnational policies surrounding information and communication infrastructure. By mapping the contours of emergent global network policies and regulations, you will explore the role of various institutions, shifts in industry, technologies, economic structures, cultural practices and changing geopolitics that shape and reshape today’s information and communications infrastructures. Given the extraterritorial nature of information and communication infrastructures at the heart of conflicts among rival states for political and economic power, and the operation of transnational corporations, policies are studied in the light of political and social struggles to control network infrastructures.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • Policy-making processes of network information and communications.
  • The role of states, institutions, and industries in structuring network infrastructures.
  • The political and economic context in which policies are constituted and implemented.
  • The nature of social and political conflict over the control of network infrastructures.
  • The implications of network information and communications policy for the public.
  • The role of geopolitics where the US as the world’s dominant information and communication power engages with its emerging oppositional powers in policy-making across the globe from China to India to Latin America to South Africa.
 
Assessment
  • Group presentation (20%)
  • Essay (80%)

Social Identities and Digital Media

Combining key theories from critical theory, cultural studies, film, gender studies and communication studies, the module will explore processes and practices of production and re-production of social identities making emphasis on said productions on digital media, paying special attention to questions of racism, colonialism and capitalism.
 
The aim of this module is to examine media representations of social identities with particular focus on gender, race, class and sexuality and its intersections.
 
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • The ways gender, race, class and sexuality identities are shaped by and shape digital media;
  • The critical theories and approaches with which to evaluate media in terms of race/ethnicity, nationality, gender, class, age, sexuality, and/or ability;
  • How the complexities of power relations and social justice influence how race, class, gender and sexuality and depicted, built and sustained in digital media;
  • Critical awareness and cultural sensitivity as it relates to professional media practices and with which to build community, civic engagement, and character in everyday life;
  • Media depictions of race, class, gender and sex from a multidisciplinary perspective while demonstrating an understanding of how these images can significantly impact individuals, society and culture;
  • The complexities of power relations and social justice influence media depictions of race, class, gender and sex;
  • Identify and debate relevant theoretical perspectives on the construction of social identities in context of digital media;
  • Describe and evaluate impact of digital technology on the production, re-production and circulation of social identities;
  • Apply and evaluate the impact of media images in the formation of personal identity and how we view others;
  • Analyse how the complexities of power relations and social justice influence how race, class, gender and sexuality and depicted in media;
  • Systematically assess the aims, motivations and effectiveness of the social and political uses of digital media;
  • Analyse emerging trends and critically evaluate received wisdom in the field;
  • Assess material gathered from a range of academic and non-academic sources in order to develop a critical understanding of theories and practices;
  • Use material presented in teaching sessions, along with other sources, to produce an in-depth evaluation of an existing research study;
  • Evaluate methodologies used in both academic and market research, and develop new research questions or hypotheses for investigation;
  • Design, implement and evaluate an original study in a topic relevant to the field;
  • Gather, process, analyse and evaluate primary data;
  • Locate and critique relevant academic and non-academic sources;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field (e.g. report writing);
  • Be able to plan, organise and manage a self-directed research case study, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.
 
Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of:

  • 30% Report
  • 70% Essay

Creative Industries in a Global Perspective

The topics covered will include: comparing contribution of creative industries to national income and employment internationally; examining international trade in creative goods and services; examining the development of transnational production of creative goods and services; examining the development of international media and cultural policy; discussing theories of cultural imperialism, globalisation and soft power.
 
The aim of this module is to allow you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the media and creative industries through comparing their development internationally.
 
Learning Outcomes
 On completion of this module, you should be able to:
 
  • Understand how and why the media and creative industries have developed nationally and internationally;
  • Understand the growth of transnational media corporations;
  • Understand the economic and cultural importance of trade in cultural goods and services;
  • Understand the implications of innovation and technological change for the internationalisation media and creative industries;
  • Understand the globalisation of media and cultural policy;
  • Identify, debate and evaluate relevant international perspectives on media and creative industries;
  • Systematically assess the implicit theoretical assumptions of contrasting international perspectives;
  • Use these perspectives to analyse emerging trends in media and creative industries internationally;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Assess the empirical validity of competing perspectives;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Understand the behaviour of companies in media and creative industries internationally;
  • Understand emerging international trends in media and creative industries;
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field;
  • Be able to plan, organise and manage coursework assignments, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.
 
Assessment
  • 100% Coursework

Cultural Industries and Creative Labour / Cultural Work

The module will cover definitions of labour and work; theoretical approaches to understanding labour and work; definitions of creative labour and work; the emergence of media and creative work; continuities and changes in media and creative work; comparisons of media and creative work in different industries and in different countries; factors affecting contemporary wages, terms and conditions in the media and creative industries.
 
This module will help you understand the continuities and changes in work and employment in the media and creative industries internationally.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module you should be able to:
 
  • Understand the theoretical frameworks for understanding work and labour in media and creative industries;
  • Understand the definitions of creativity;
  • Understand the major trends in employment internationally in the media and creative industries;
  • Understand the continuities and changes in the wages, terms and conditions of those working in media and creative industries;
  • Identify, debate and evaluate relevant theoretical on media and creative labour and work;
  • Understand the development of media and creative work historically through applying these frameworks;
  • Use these frameworks to analyse emerging trends in media and creative work;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Assess the empirical validity of competing perspectives;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Understand the behaviour of media and creative workers;
  • Understand emerging trends in media and creative work;
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field;
  • Plan, organise and manage coursework assignments, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality
 
Assessment
100% Coursework consisting of:
 
  • 30% Report
  • 70% Coursework

Media Audiences, Users and Markets

This module will cover a range of approaches to studying media audiences, users and markets, developed both within academic research and in the media and creative industries. Content will include: public debates about media audiences, users and markets; key theoretical paradigms in media audience research; the history of research and debate on media audiences; methodological and ethical issues in research design and analysis; the implications of new digital media for audience behaviour and for research; practices of market research within the media and creative industries.
 
The aim of this module is to introduce you to the major theoretical and methodological issues at stake in researching people's engagement with media, as audiences, users and consumers. The module examines the historical evolution of audience research; the key theoretical paradigms in the field; the practice of market research, and how it is employed within the media and creative industries; methodological and ethical dimensions of research; and the implications of new media technologies, both for the experience of audiences/users/consumers and for the practice of research. Case studies will be presented by visiting speakers from relevant organisations in the media and creative industries.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module, you should be able to:
 
  • Understand the major research trends in the academic study of media audiences, including social-psychological and Cultural Studies perspectives;
  • Understand the aims, methods and practices of market and consumer research within the media and creative industries;
  • Understand the methodological choices entailed in studying media audiences, and their implications and consequences for research findings;
  • Understand the implications of new media technologies for audience/user behaviour, and for the practice of audience and market research;
  • Identify and debate relevant theoretical perspectives on media audiences, users and markets;
  • Describe and evaluate methodological procedures and practices used in this field;
  • Systematically assess the implicit theoretical assumptions and methodologies employed in specific research studies;
  • Analyse emerging trends and critically evaluate received wisdom in the field;
  • Gather, process, analyse and evaluate primary data;
  • Locate and critique relevant academic and non-academic sources;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Understand the working practices and methods employed in relevant sectors of the media and creative industries (e.g. market research);
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field (e.g. report writing);
  • Plan, organise and manage a self-directed research case study, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.
 
Assessment
100% Coursework consisting of:
 
  • 30% Report
  • 70% Essay

Media Law and Policy

This module provides a fascinating introduction to the principal issues surrounding media law and policy, including the sources of law, intellectual property, the creation and transfer of intellectual property rights, media finance, free speech, privacy and defamation, content and spectrum regulation, competition law and international regulation.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
 
  • The fundamental legal concepts underpinning the media industries;
  • The creation, role and use of intellectual property in media;
  • The significance of the trade in media rights;
  • How media rights are transferred;
  • How media rights are used to drive the financing of media projects;
  • The key debates in content regulation over free speech, privacy, defamation, hate speech, blasphemy and other forms of control;
  • The way in which the regulation of access to media remains important even in the internet age;
  • The role of competition law and regulation;
  • The role of international organisations, laws and treaties in regulating the media.
 
Assessment
  • 50% essay
  • 50% exam

Second subject modules (choose one)

Introduction to Diplomacy

This module will introduce the main concepts, theories and practices of international relations and diplomacy.
 
The overarching aim of the module is to provide you with a wider understanding of the historical trends, conceptual bases and current practices of diplomacy in the context of current global affairs and to help them critically evaluate the relevance for all fields of social, economic and scientific practice. As part of such aim, the module will advance an interdisciplinary ethos.
 
Learning outcomes
On completion of this module you should be able to:
 
  • Evaluate the historical evolution of the modern international system
  • Critically evaluate the key concepts and theories of diplomacy
  • Evaluate the role and behaviours of international organisations and states in the international system
  • Evaluate the context of the present-day international political and economic relations within which diplomacy takes place
  • Identify and assess the importance of such dynamics for their respective fields of study
  • Construct reasoned arguments utilising concepts and approaches to the study of diplomacy
  • Recognise established and emergent phenomena in the practice of diplomacy within the current global affairs
  • Creatively and critically evaluate the possibilities of various intersections between diplomatic practice and the objectives and modes of delivery in their respective fields
  • Via in-class team tasks, and in assessed assignments, apply such skills to empirically grounded case study materials
  • Reflect on own learning and make use of constructive feedback
  • Gather and organise evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources
  • Work in small groups
  • Develop research and presentation skills
  • Develop a cross-disciplinary and collaborative research and learning ethos
 
Assessment
  • 40% Presentation
  • 60% Essay

Sport Media and Marketing

This module will include: the main themes that underpin media and marketing, the evolution of media and marketing in a sport context, the practices and techniques for effective sport media and marketing, the types of media and marketing, and consumer and fan engagement.
 
The aims of this module are to be introduced to key concepts in sport media and marketing and to develop understanding of the nature of sport media and marketing.
 
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module you should be able to:
 
  • Assess the major theories, principles, and concepts surrounding sport media and marketing;
  • Apply techniques and practices involved in conceptualising and developing a marketing plan;
  • Gather, analyse, and present sport media and marketing ideas and concepts;
  • Apply sport media and marketing principles that can be utilised in different sport environments;
  • Demonstrate initiative and personal responsibility;
  • Continue to learn independently and to develop professionally.
 
Assessment
  • 40% Sponsorship Pitch
  • 60% Marketing Plan

Future career prospects

Graduates from our Global Communication and Development programme are highly-qualified to work in a variety of communication and development roles across a range of sectors, including tourism, the media and the government.
 
Teaching of global communication trends means graduates of this programme will be well placed to influence communications and practices in roles across the world, especially in the Global South.
 
Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking a PhD programme in media or a creative discipline.

 

Your personal development

Enterprise Through the Curriculum is an intrinsic element of every master’s programme at Loughborough University London and has been carefully designed to give students the best possible chance of securing their dream role. From employability profiling to live group projects set by a business or organisation, and from site visits to organisation-based dissertation opportunities, Loughborough University London is the first of its kind to develop a suite of activities and support that is positioned as the underpinning of every student’s experience.

Assessments

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, group exercises, presentations and time constrained assignments. Subject to your choices, there may also be exams. Take a look at our modules to see the type of assessments you can expect to undertake.

Speak to a programme specialist

If you'd like to know more about this programme, you can request an email or telephone call from an academic responsible for the teaching of this programme. 

 

Complete the contact request form