Programme information

This programme provides an umbilical link between theory and practice, providing training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy. You will learn in an environment tailor-made for the development of diplomatic skills at an inspiring new campus in London, one of the world’s greatest cities and home to 163 Embassies and High Commissions. 

You will be provided with a specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of diplomacy deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with practice in the field. Our students are challenged to acquire a critical awareness of the New World Order and how this concept relates to current issues involved in the study of diplomacy, learning from the past to deal with the challenges of the future.

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Programme aims

  • To provide specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of diplomacy deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with the specific subject area
  • To enable students to acquire a critical awareness of the current issues involved in the study of diplomacy
  • To provide training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy
  • To offer opportunities for independent study and research within the field of diplomacy
  • To equip students with the skills to pursue careers as trained specialists in diplomacy

Entry requirements

An honours degree (2:2 or above) or equivalent overseas qualification in a social sciences, humanities or associated subject.

Overseas qualification equivalencies

English Language requirements

All applicants for admission to Loughborough University must have a qualification in English Language before they can be admitted to any course or programme, whether their first language is English or not.

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Assessments

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, group exercises, presentations and time constrained assignments. Subject to your choices, there may also be exams. Take a look at our modules below to see what assessments you can expect to undertake.

Future career prospects

Graduates of this programme will be equipped with the advanced skills and expertise in order to pursue a career as a trained specialist in diplomacy, international and communication or another related field.

Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MRes or PhD programme.

 

Fees and funding

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. The standard tuition fees for this course are:

  • £10,000 (UK/EU)
  • £18,500 (International)

University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment. Special arrangements are made for payments by part-time students.

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Programme modules

This programme covers a wide range of topics; to give you a taster we have expanded on some of the core modules affiliated with this programme and the specific assessment methods associated with each module.

This programme is taught mostly in the evenings and on Saturdays. To qualify for the award of the MSc degree in Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy you must complete five compulsory modules, choose any two optional modules and choose one module from the second subject modules list, totalling 120 credits. Students must also complete a Dissertation worth 60 credits.

In the first semester, students will pick a subject from the list of nominated Second Subject modules offered by the other Loughborough University London Institutes.

All students taking MSc Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy will be given specific guidance on optional choices to help them make the correct choice for their chosen career development path.

Core modules

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 1

This module will give you an introduction into the Evolution of the international system, Diplomacy and International Relations; The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations; Defining and Implementing Foreign Policy, Diplomatic negotiation and international bargaining; International Diplomacy in the 21st Century.

The aim of this module to introduce students to the concepts and theories underpinning the study of international diplomacy, with particular reference to the dynamics of diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes
  • Critically evaluate the concepts and theories of diplomacy as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques
  • Analyse the processes of diplomatic policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves
  • Critically evaluate the importance of assessment, advocacy, bargaining and persuasion as dynamic features of the study of diplomacy
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving methods
  • Critically assess concepts and ethics of diplomacy in a professional environment
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills
  • Communication and ICT skills
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy
Assessment
  • 30% Presentation
  • 70% Critical Report

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 2

The aim of this module to introduce students to the context, challenges and skills of diplomatic practice in a rapidly changing international environment.

Learning Outcomes
  • Critically evaluate the context of international political, cultural and economic relations within which diplomacy takes place
  • Analyse the processes of negotiation within international diplomacy
  • Critically evaluate the important of key international events on the practice of diplomacy today
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving approaches to diplomatic practice
  • Critically assess the impact of ethnic and regional conflicts on the conduct of diplomats 
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy, including assessments of diplomatic situations
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for informing diplomatic practice
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills
  • Communication and ICT Skills
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to diplomatic practice
Assessment
  • 30% Case study
  • 70% Exam

Diplomatic Discourse

The modules includes: speech art theory; critical discourse analysis; diplomatic drafting framing/reframing; handling/withholding information; explicit/implicit language, genres and registers, creative ambiguity and speech writing/analysis.

The aim of this module to introduce students to the theoretical approaches to the study of language and to develop competence in effective diplomatic discourse and communication.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate verbal and written diplomatic texts, norms and conventions;
  • Analyse diplomatic discourses and diplomatic speech/speech-writing;
  • Critically demonstrate awareness of language choices in diplomatic exchanges and dialogue;
  • Critically assess diplomatic texts, argumentation and persuasion;
  • Identify appropriate sources of diplomatic language, speech and speech-writing and information handling; - formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomatic discourse;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomatic discourse and communication.
Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of;

  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Foreign Policy Analysis

Introduction: What is foreign policy analysis? Explaining foreign policy: the system level. Explaining foreign policy: the nation-state level. Explaining foreign policy: the level of the individual decision-maker. Interests, norms and ethics: the critical evaluation of foreign policy. Case 1. US foreign policy. Case 2. UK foreign policy. Case 3. Russia foreign policy. Case 4. China foreign policy. The Future of Foreign Policy Analysis I: Resilience and International Crisis Management. The Future of Foreign Policy Analysis II: Interplay of International Institutions and Global Arena.

The aim of this module is to the aim of this module is for students to understand the conceptual tools of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA), acquire specific knowledge relevant to an understanding of the foreign policies of key state actors in the global arena, and develop awareness of the issues and policy contexts that shape these policies.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Situate the analysis of foreign policy within the field of International Relations;
  • Identify and deploy the key concepts and terminology of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA);
  • Identify and evaluate key issues shaping the formulation and implementation of foreign policy;
  • Apply this knowledge to specific cases of foreign policy decision-making and compare these cases in a systematic manner;
  • Locate FPA information and evidence from primary and secondary sources;
  • Identify the main approaches to the study of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) and Comparative Foreign Policy (CFP);
  • Critically assess foreign policy practice;
  • Employ critical judgement in relation to case studies of US and UK foreign policy;
  • Locate and use appropriate evidence base in a critical essay;
  • Reflect on their own learning and use constructive feedback from the module tutor, and peers.
Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of:

  • 40% Essay 1
  • 60% Essay 2

International Protocol and Etiquette

This module will include: historical background of protocol: the evolution of the practices and norms at various historical epochs and different cultures that culminated into today’s protocol procedures. Critical assessment of how these norms have constituted the very development of diplomatic relations, not only through observance but also through revision that has brought change on the global political scene. Contemporary practice of international protocol and etiquette, including rules and procedures of protocol for State and private visits; Event Management, with emphasis on risk management including security; the protocol of organization of press conferences. Protocol in International Organisations, and appreciation of cultural specificities practiced by large multilateral organisations such as the United Nations; how such protocol may be used to advance multiculturalism. The similarities and differences of different protocol cultures. The Role of the Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps and diplomatic clubs and associations. Media protocol: correct protocol for dealing with national and international press representatives, including press releases and interview techniques. Business protocol: correct protocol and etiquette when dealing with multinational and multiethnic business representatives. Multi-national, multi-ethnic and gender etiquett

The aims of this module are to: Strengthen students' understanding and awareness of the importance of diplomatic protocol, i.e. the set of customary and legal norms and codes of practice governing diplomatic exchanges and affairs on the international scene; as well as corporate protocol and social etiquette, and good grasp of different protocol culture. Provide students with the opportunity to relate critically and creatively this knowledge and understanding to issues of diplomacy studied in other modules taught by the Academy, including issues of cultural perception and projection, negotiation skills, religion, public diplomacy, international security; and diplomatic discourse. Provide students with the opportunity to critically engage and evaluate empirical cases where protocol and etiquette related issues have critical impact on the outcome of a diplomatic situation/crisis. Provide students with the experience to apply the knowledge and skills gained on different protocol cultures to evaluate and find best solutions to simulated situations such as hosting of a World Summit, or heads of state visit, through critical inquiry-based learning. Provide students with an opportunity to work collaboratively in groups to strengthen their team working skills and awareness of cultural differences by taking roles of project leadership and management.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Undertake a project development and management process, through the critical application of knowledge to simulated situations such as hosting of a World Summit, or heads of state visit, appreciating different stages of such process and the challenges these entail;
  • Work in teams to apply innovative problem solving methods to evaluate and find solutions to simulated diplomatic situations, through solid understanding and utilization of knowledge in the current practices and procedures of international protocol and etiquette, including: Formalised provisions, including the rights, privileges and obligations of diplomats enshrined in the Vienna Convention; how these have been applied and revised over time; Conventional (unwritten) norms and rules; In the information age, the rule of internet etiquette or virtual protocol;
  • Critically assess through the project ways in which protocol and etiquette may help transcend national boundaries and build relations across cultural, religious and political differences;
  • Critically evaluate through the project the dilemmas and political balance that needs to be made between the preservation of traditional protocol and etiquette rules and revisions of such rules need to be addressed in a simulated diplomatic situation; collect and analyse appropriate data towards the evaluation and solution of the identified problem;
  • Evaluate simulated situations of diplomatic engagement;
  • Effectively apply such assessment to find best solutions in groups;
  • Develop appreciation for other points of view, critically reflect on and evaluate the proposed solutions, and analyse them comparatively against possible alternatives;
  • Work constructively in a project group to plan and execute a project plan;
  • Make informed decisions in time-limited situations, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time management to perform project leadership and management roles;
  • Deploy a range of IT skills;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing in a variety of media.
Assessment
  • 20% Group Project Plan
  • 20% Individual Self Reflection Report 
  • 60% Group Simulation - Exercise/Presentation

Dissertation

The module will equip the student with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding to embark on their individual research project and they will be guided through the three options available to them to complete their dissertation:

  • A desk based research project that could be set by an organisation or could be a subject of the student's choice
  • A project that involves collection of primary data from within an organisation or based on lab and/or field experiments
  • An Internship within an organisation during which time students will complete a project as part of their role in agreement with the organisation (subject to a suitable placement position being obtained)

Students will achieve a high level of understanding in the subject area and produce a written thesis or project report which will discuss this research in depth and with rigour.

The aims of this module are to give the student the opportunity to study a subject, business problem or research question in depth and to research the issues surrounding the subject or background to the problem.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The importance of project planning;
  • The importance of a clear hypothesis or research question;
  • The ethical implications of research;
  • The relevant empirical data and methodologies for data collection or knowledge assimilation for the subject area;
  • Methods of data analysis and their suitability for the intended data;
  • The areas of expertise or publications of the major individuals or organisations in the subject or business area;
  • The previous research or current knowledge in the specific subject or business area;
  • Theoretical perspectives relevant to their chosen topic;
  • The data or knowledge that they have assimilated in the course of the project;
  • The most effective methods of presentation of this data or knowledge;
  • Articulate a clear, coherent and original research question, hypothesis or business problem in a suitable subject area;
  • Synthesise relevant sources (e.g. research literature, primary data) to construct a coherent argument in response to their research question, hypothesis or business problem;
  • Analyse primary or secondary data collected by an appropriate method;
  • Critically evaluate data collected in context with previously published knowledge or information;
  • Engage in critical debate and argumentation in written work;
  • Apply principles of good scholarly practice to their written work;
  • Perform appropriate literature searching/business information searching using library databases or other reputable sources;
  • Determine the most appropriate research methods for a particular subject area;
  • Plan a research project and produce a realistic gantt chart demonstrating their intended timelines;
  • Synthesise information from appropriate sources;
  • Demonstrate rational use of research method tools;
  • Select and use appropriate investigative and research skills;
  • Demonstrate effective project planning skills;
  • Find and evaluate scholarly sources;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Demonstrate effective report writing skills;
  • Recognise and use their resources effectively;
  • Demonstrate resourcefulness to carry out data collection;
  • Successfully manage a project from idea to completion;
  • Demonstrate commercial awareness or the impact of knowledge transfer in a business or research environment.
Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of:

  • 20% Literature Review
  • 20% Research Proposal    
  • 60% Dissertation Report/Essay

Optional modules

Economic Global Governance

Introduction; Understanding the global economy; Global Governance and Global Economic Governance; The Workings of Global Governance; Issues and Challenges; The global financial system; The Challenges of Interdependence; Public Policy; Corporate Actions and the Global Economy; Diplomacy and Global Governance.

The aim of this module to assess the validity of economic factors in international affairs and to understand the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the role of economic factors in international affairs;
  • Analyse the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance;
  • Critically demonstrate awareness of the workings of global governance today;
  • Critically assess concepts and practice of global governance ;
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of the global economy and global governance; - formulate research questions and research strategies for studying global governance;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of global economic governance.
Assessment
  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Economic Diplomacy

Definitions of Economic Diplomacy, approaches to free trade and international trade, investment climates and the role of attracting foreign direct investments (FDI), Governmental economic policy instruments, soft and civilian power, the role of sanctions, the emergence of international economic institutions, the role of multinational corporations, Economic diplomacy of governments and governing diplomacy with multinational corporations and international institutions.

The aim of this module is to introduce students to key concepts and the practice of Economic Diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the main theoretical and analytical perspectives of Economic Diplomacy with the field of international relations;
  • Analyse the linkages between theoretical perspectives and their application to practical case studies of: Economic Diplomacy; - critically evaluate the contemporary challenges of Economic Diplomacy - critically evaluate theories and conceptual approaches appropriate to the study of Economic Diplomacy;
  • critically apply theories and concepts to case studies of Economic Diplomacy;
  • Identify case studies of Economic Diplomacy;
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying Economic Diplomacy;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of Economic Diplomacy.
Assessment
  • 30% Presentation
  • 70% Critical Report

Diplomacy and Religion

The role of religion in the conduct of international relations; rise and development of religious belief; main belief systems, religious principles values and ideals; Commonalities and Divergences; Links with Civilisation, Nationalism, Parochialism, Commerce, Politics, Ethics; Attitudes to Security, War and Peace; Tensions with Modernity, Science, Secularism, Human Rights, Gender Equality; Relevance to Diplomacy; Hard and Soft Power in a Globalised World; Methods and Strategies, Case Study and Simulations.

The aim of this module to introduce students to the complex interrelationship between diplomacy and religion at the national, regional and international levels, with an emphasis on critical awareness of how diplomacy and religion have bearing on issues of war and peace.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the genesis and dynamics of key religious ideologies and movements and their interaction with diplomacy;
  • Analyse how diplomacy and religion interact in practice;
  • Critically evaluate how diplomatic strategies and outcomes accommodate religious considerations.
  • Critically apply conceptual knowledge to actual situations that require accurate assessment of diplomacy and religion;
  • Identify appropriate sources identifying the roles for diplomacy in these settings and scenarios; - formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy and religion;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy and religion.
Assessment
  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Cultural Projection and Perception

Culture as identity and communication in a globalised and globalising world;, Verbal and non-verbal factors in cultural projection and perception; The Relevance of cultural and intercultural awareness to negotiation and conflict resolution; The cultural environment of global business; Encoding and decoding messages in multicultural negotiations and work teams; Overcoming phobias, barriers and culture shock; Dialogue, mutual respect and benefits.

The aim of this module is to provide a thorough understanding of the concepts and importance of intercultural communication, cultural diplomacy, reputation management, image and cultural projection and perception, especially in relation to diplomatic activity.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the main concepts of intercultural communication;
  • Analyse the existing and potential utility of intercultural communication in appropriate situations in diverse and multicultural settings;
  • Critically evaluate intercultural communication strategies and outcomes;
  • Critically apply conceptual knowledge to actual situations that require accurate assessment of intercultural interchanges;
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the development of concepts and theories of intercultural communication;
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying intercultural communication;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of intercultural communication.
Assessment
  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Second subject modules (your choice of one)

Management Skills

The interface between diplomacy and the organisation; organisational styles and strategies; organisational politics; the diplomat and official as an internal consultant; financing projects; the financial basis of decision making; effective use of time; leadership styles; motivating others; body language; communication skills; ethics; workplace diversity, behavioural standards and licensing.

The aims of this module are to: Understand and analyse key aspects of management and leadership. Develop a foundation of management knowledge and skills that can be related to diplomacy and diplomatic practice; Develop a core understanding of management and organisational practice that will inform subsequent modules; Understand and analyse the Management of Change within an organisational setting. And understand the relationship between departments within an organizational environment.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Analyse organisational behaviour and identify the changing nature of organisation;
  • Evaluate how the process of change has implications for diplomats and officials;
  • Calculate the basis of investment appraisal and financial decision making;
  • Analyse the relationship between diplomacy and the organizational body;
  • Discuss and debate the evolving nature of management within organisations;
  • Critically assess the nature of management and leadership within organisations and diplomatic practice ; - construct strategies aimed at people motivation;
  • Understand the Ethical Dimensions within a organisational environment;
  • Write an essay in a coherent and logical fashion;
  • Collect ideas and data from a range of sources;
  • Learn and work in an independent fashion;
  • Demonstrate a research capability.
Assessment
  • 40% Oral Presentation
  • 60% Coursework