MSc Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy

Academy of Diplomacy and International Governance

This programme provides an umbilical link between theory and practice, providing training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy. This programme offers teaching and contact hours in the evenings and on Saturdays only.

You will learn in an environment tailor-made for the development of diplomatic skills at an inspiring new campus in London, one of the world’s greatest cities and home to 163 Embassies and High Commissions. You will be provided with a specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of diplomacy deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with practice in the field.

Our students are challenged to acquire a critical awareness of the New World Order and how this concept relates to current issues involved in the study of diplomacy, learning from the past to deal with the challenges of the future.

Programme Aims

a) To provide specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of diplomacy deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with the specific subject area

b) To enable students to acquire a critical awareness of the current issues involved in the study of diplomacy

c) To provide training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy

d) To offer opportunities for independent study and research within the field of diplomacy

e) To equip students with the skills to pursue careers as trained specialists in diplomacy

Programme Structure

This programme offers teaching and contact hours in the evenings and on Saturdays only. To qualify for the award of the MSc degree in Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy you must complete five compulsory modules, choose any two optional modules and choose one module from the second subject modules list, totalling 120 credits. Students must also complete a Dissertation worth 60 credits.

In the first semester, students will pick a subject from the list of nominated Second Subject modules offered by the other Loughborough University London Institutes.

All students taking MSc Diplomacy, Statecraft and Foreign Policy will be given specific guidance on optional choices to help them make the correct choice for their chosen career development path.

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Duration

1 year full-time or up to 4 years part-time.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, group exercises, presentations and time constrained assignments. Subject to your choices, there may also be exams.

Entry qualifications

Minimum of a lower Second Class Honours degree (2:2) from a UK university or equivalent overseas qualification recognised by Loughborough University, or a Postgraduate Diploma from a British or overseas university. Applicants with at least five years diplomatic experience or other international work experience will also be considered.

English Language requirements: IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each subtest (Reading, Listening, Writing and Speaking) or equivalent. See: www.lboro.ac.uk/international/englang/.

Career prospects

Our students will be equipped with the skills to pursue careers as trained specialists in diplomacy and related disciplines.

Fees and Funding

£10,000 (UK/EU) / £18,500 (International)

Click here to see our available scholarships for 2017 entry.

Compulsory modules

Dissertation

Module Description

The aim of this module is for the student to conduct an individual research project on a core programme related topic which is either an issue of their choice, an exploratory question agreed with an industry/external partner. The project will investigate this research in depth and with rigour. The project should build on methodological skills developed in earlier modules.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The overall goal of the Dissertation module is for the student to display the knowledge and capability required to perform independent work within the context of the programme of study.

Modular Weight

60 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1 and 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (555 hours)

Lectures (25 hours)

Tutorials (20 hours)

Assessment

Dissertation (80%)

Project proposal (20%)

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 1

Module Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the concepts and theories underpinning the study of international diplomacy, with particular reference to the dynamics of diplomacy.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the concepts and theories of diplomacy as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques

b) Analyse the processes of diplomatic policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves

c) Critically evaluate the importance of assessment, advocacy, bargaining and persuasion as dynamic features of the study of diplomacy

d) Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving methods

e) Critically assess concepts and ethics of diplomacy in a professional environment

f) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy

j) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy

k) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

l) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience

m) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

n) Communication and ICT skills

o) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Critical report (60%)

Policy brief (40%)

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 2

Module Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the context, challenges and skills of diplomatic practice in a rapidly changing international environment.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the context of international political, cultural and economic relations within which diplomacy takes place

b) Analyse the processes of negotiation within international diplomacy

c) Critically evaluate the important of key international events on the practice of diplomacy today

d) Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving approaches to diplomatic practice

e) Critically assess the impact of ethnic and regional conflicts on the conduct of diplomats

f) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy, including assessments of diplomatic situations

g) Formulate research questions and research strategies for informing diplomatic practice

h) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

i) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience.

j) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

k) Communication and ICT Skills

l) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to diplomatic practice

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Written Exam (70%)

Essay (30%)

Diplomatic Discourse

Module Description

The aim of this module to introduce students to the theoretical approaches to the study of language and to develop competence in effective diplomatic discourse and communication.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate verbal and written diplomatic texts, norms and conventions

b) Analyse diplomatic discourses and diplomatic speech/speech-writing

c) Critically demonstrate awareness of language choices in diplomatic exchanges and dialogue

d) Critically assess diplomatic texts, argumentation and persuasion

e) Identify appropriate sources of diplomatic language, speech and speech-writing and information handling

f) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomatic discourse

g) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

h) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience

i) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

j) Communication and ICT Skills

k) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomatic discourse and communication

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Presentation (60%)

Critical report (40%)

Foreign Policy Analysis

Module Description

The aim of this module is for students to understand the conceptual tools of Foreign Policy Analysis, acquire specific knowledge relevant to an understanding of the foreign policies of key state actors in the global arena and develop awareness of the issues and policy contexts that shape these policies.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a)Situate the analysis of foreign policy within the field of International Relations

b) Identify and deploy the key concepts and terminology of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA)

c) Identify and evaluate key issues shaping the formulation and implementation of foreign policy

d) Apply this knowledge to specific cases of foreign policy decision-making and compare these cases in a systematic manner

e) Locate FPA information and evidence from primary and secondary sources;

f) Identify the main approaches to the study of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) and Comparative Foreign Policy (CFP)

g) Critically assess foreign policy practice

h) Employ critical judgement in relation to case studies of US and UK foreign policy;

i) Locate and use appropriate evidence base in a critical essay

j) Reflect on their own learning and use constructive feedback from the module tutor, and peers

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Coursework 1 (60%)

Coursework 2 (40%)

International Protocol and Etiquette

Module Description

The aims of this module are to strengthen students' understanding and awareness of the importance of diplomatic protocol and gain a good grasp of different protocol cultures. The module will provide students with the opportunity to critically engage and evaluate empirical cases where protocol and etiquette related issues have critical impact on the outcome of a diplomatic situation/crisis.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Undertake a project development and management process, through the critical application of knowledge to simulated situations such as hosting of a World Summit, or heads of state visit, appreciating different stages of such process and the challenges these entail

b) Work in teams to apply innovative problem solving methods to evaluate and find solutions to simulated diplomatic situations, through solid understanding and utilization of knowledge in the current practices and procedures of international protocol and etiquette, including:

*Formalised provisions, including the rights, privileges and obligations of diplomats enshrined in the Vienna Convention; how these have been applied and revised over time;

*Conventional (unwritten) norms and rules

*In the information age, the rule of internet etiquette or virtual protocol

c) Critically assess through the project ways in which protocol and etiquette may help transcend national boundaries and build relations across cultural, religious and political differences

d) Critically evaluate through the project the dilemmas and political balance that needs to be made between the preservation of traditional protocol and etiquette rules and revisions of such rules.

e) Identify the areas that need to be addressed in a simulated diplomatic situation; collect and analyse appropriate data towards the evaluation and solution of the identified problem

f) Evaluate simulated situations of diplomatic engagement and effectively apply such assessment to find best solutions in groups

g) Develop appreciation for others' points of view, critically reflect on and evaluate the proposed solutions, and analyse them comparatively against possible alternatives.

h) Make informed decisions in time-limited situations, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time management to perform project leadership and management roles

i) Historical background of protocol: the evolution of the practices and norms at various historical epochs and different cultures that culminated into today¿s protocol procedures

j) Critical assessment of how these norms have constituted the very development of diplomatic relations, not only through observance but also through revision that has brought change on the global political scene

k) Contemporary practice of international protocol and etiquette, including rules and procedures of protocol for State and private visits; Event Management, with emphasis on risk management including security; the protocol of organization of press conferences

l) Protocol in International Organisations, and appreciation of cultural specificities practiced by large multilateral organisations such as the United Nations; how such protocol may be used to advance multiculturalism

m) Understand the Role of the Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps and diplomatic clubs and associations

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (130 hours)

Seminars (2 hours)

Lectures (14 hours)

Practical Classes and Workshops (4 hours)

Assessment

Group Project Plan (20%)

Individual Self Reflection Report (20%)

Group Simulation - Exercise/Presentation (60%)

Optional modules

Choose two modules only

Economic Global Governance

Module Description

The aim of this module is to assess the validity of economic factors in international affairs and to understand the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the role of economic factors in international affairs

b) Analyse the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance

c) Critically demonstrate awareness of the workings of global governance today

d) Critically assess concepts and practice of global governance

e) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of the global economy and global governance

f) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying global governance

g) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

h) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience.

i) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

j) Develop communication and ICT Skills

k) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of global economic governance

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Presentation (60%)

Critical report (40%)

The Politics and Practice of the European Union

Module Description

The aim of this module is for students to understand the institutions and decision-making procedures of the European Union as well as key policy domains that are of particular interest to diplomacy and diplomatic perspectives.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Situate the analysis of European Integration and the European Union

b) Identify and deploy the key concepts, theories and terminology of European Integration

c) Identify and evaluate key institutions and decision-making procedures of the European Union

d) Apply this knowledge to selected policy fields

e) Locate studies of European Integration and the European Union from primary and secondary sources

f) Identify the main approaches to the study of European Integration and the European Union

g) Critically assess the practical workings of the European Union

h) Employ critical judgement in relation to case studies of selected European Union policy areas

i) Locate and use appropriate evidence base in a critical report

j) Reflect on their own learning and use constructive feedback from the module tutor, and peers

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Tutorials (20 hours)

Lectures (8 hours)

Assessment

Individual report (60%)

Individual report (40%)

Economic Diplomacy

Module Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to key concepts and the practice of Economic Diplomacy.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the main theoretical and analytical perspectives of Economic Diplomacy with the field of international relations

b) Analyse the linkages between theoretical perspectives and their application to practical case studies of Economic Diplomacy

c) Critically evaluate the contemporary challenges of Economic Diplomacy

d) Critically evaluate theories and conceptual approaches appropriate to the study of Economic Diplomacy

e) Critically apply theories and concepts to case studies of Economic Diplomacy

f) Identify case studies of Economic Diplomacy

g) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying Economic Diplomacy

h) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

i) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience

j) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

k) Communication and ICT Skills

l) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of Economic Diplomacy

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Practical classes and workshops (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Critical report (70%)

Presentation (30%)

Diplomacy and Religion

Module Description

The aim of this module to introduce students to the complex interrelationship between diplomacy and religion at the national, regional and international levels, with an emphasis on critical awareness of how diplomacy and religion have bearing on issues of war and peace.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the genesis and dynamics of key religious ideologies and movements and their interaction with diplomacy

b) Analyse how diplomacy and religion interact in practice

c) Critically evaluate how diplomatic strategies and outcomes accommodate religious considerations

d) Critically apply conceptual knowledge to actual situations that require accurate assessment of diplomacy and religion

e) Identify appropriate sources identifying the roles for diplomacy in these settings and scenarios

f) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy and religion

g) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

h) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience.

i) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

j) Communication and ICT skills

k) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy and religion

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Lectures (16 hours)

Seminars (12 hours)

Assessment

Presentation (60%)

Critical report (40%)

Cultural Projection and Perception

Module Description

The aim of this module is to provide a thorough understanding of the concepts and importance of intercultural communication, cultural diplomacy, reputation management, image and cultural projection and perception, especially in relation to diplomatic activity.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the main concepts of intercultural communication

b) Analyse the existing and potential utility of intercultural communication in appropriate situations in diverse and multicultural settings

c) Critically evaluate intercultural communication strategies and outcomes.

d) Critically apply conceptual knowledge to actual situations that require accurate assessment of intercultural interchanges

e) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the development of concepts and theories of intercultural communication

f) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying intercultural communication

g) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

h) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience.

i) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

j) Communication and ICT skills

k) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of intercultural communication

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Lectures (16 hours)

Seminars (12 hours)

Assessment

Presentation (60%)

Critical report (40%)

Second subject modules

Management Skills

Module Description

The aims of this module are for the student to:

a) Understand and analyse key aspects of management and leadership;

b) Develop a foundation of management knowledge and skills that can be related to diplomacy and diplomatic practice

c) Develop a core understanding of management and organisational practice that will inform subsequent modules

d) Understand and analyse the Management of Change within an organisational setting

e) Uunderstand the relationship between departments within an organizational environment

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Analyse organisational behaviour and identify the changing nature of organisation

b) Evaluate how the process of change has implications for diplomats and officials

c) Calculate the basis of investment appraisal and financial decision making

d) Analyse the relationship between diplomacy and the organizational body

e) Discuss and debate the evolving nature of management within organisations

e) Critically assess the nature of management and leadership within organisations and diplomatic practice

f) Construct strategies aimed at people motivation

g) Understand the Ethical Dimensions within a organisational environment.

h) Write an essay in a coherent and logical fashion

i) Collect ideas and data from a range of sources

j) Learn and work in an independent fashion

k) Demonstrate a research capability

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Lectures (28 hours)

Assessment

Coursework (60%)

Oral Exam (40%)


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