MSc Diplomacy and the Digital State

Academy of Diplomacy and International Governance

Loughborough will be the first University to offer this opportunity to develop the future leaders and forward thinkers in government administration in the UK and beyond. The programme will be run jointly with Loughborough’s reputable Institute for Digital Technologies.

Students enrolled on this programme will be introduced to the practice, procedures and dynamics of diplomacy, as well as the relevance of the emerging technologies to the effective functioning of the nation state, including the economy, public services and cyber security. They will have the opportunity to engage with the very latest cyber security principles, practices, tools, and techniques through practical application, analysing and evaluating problems and responding to challenges in real time; to examine the internet as a way of democratising diplomacy and government and the proliferation of influence on policy through ICT concerning governments, the media, NGOs, Non-State Actors, and the Citizenry.

Programme Aims:

  • To enable students to critically analyse the conceptual complexities of the digital state as an emerging concept.

  • To enable students to evaluate the challenges in international relations, diplomacy, global economy and security facing governments and global governance structures brought about by the digital state.

  • To encourage critical analysis of the challenges in cyber security faced by government, industry and society, and foster a creative approach to addressing those challenges in the most effective way.

  • To enhance students’ knowledge and develop their expertise in utilising both cyber-security and big data analytics techniques to better analyse and evaluate problems and respond to challenges with practical applications in real time.

  • To enable students to develop skills essential to the conduct of diplomacy, state management, the cyber security industries and related businesses, such as ICT, ecommerce, and governmental organisations using action-based learning.

  • To empower students to engage perceptively and creatively with the concepts of open government, transparency, participation and public accountability.

Duration

1 year full-time and up to 4 years part-time

Assessment

Teaching on the Diplomacy and the Digital State programme is provided by our world-class academic staff. You will also learn from, and network with, pioneering thought leaders from a range of organisations.

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, group exercises, presentations and time constrained assignments and written exams

Entry qualifications

A minimum of a lower second class honours degree in electronics, computing, physics, mathematics or a related technical degree or overseas qualification recognised by Loughborough University. Consideration will be given to exceptional candidates from other disciplines.

English Language requirements: IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each subtest (Reading, Listening, Writing and Speaking) or equivalent. See www.lboro.ac.uk/international/englang/

Career prospects

Graduates from this programme will be in a very strong position to work for diplomatic missions, other government departments, multinational corporations, NGOs and security organisations. Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MRes or PhD programme.

Compulsory modules

Dissertation

Module Description

The aim of this module is for the student to conduct an individual research project on a core programme related topic which is either an issue of their choice, an exploratory question agreed with an industry/external partner. The project will investigate this research in depth and with rigour. The project should build on methodological skills developed in earlier modules.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The overall goal of the Dissertation module is for the student to display the knowledge and capability required to perform independent work within the context of the programme of study.

Modular Weight

60 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1 and 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (555 hours)

Lectures (25 hours)

Tutorials (20 hours)

Assessment

Dissertation (80%)

Project proposal (20%)

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 1

Module Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the concepts and theories underpinning the study of international diplomacy, with particular reference to the dynamics of diplomacy.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the concepts and theories of diplomacy as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques

b) Analyse the processes of diplomatic policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves

c) Critically evaluate the importance of assessment, advocacy, bargaining and persuasion as dynamic features of the study of diplomacy

d) Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving methods

e) Critically assess concepts and ethics of diplomacy in a professional environment

f) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy

j) Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy

k) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

l) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience

m) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

n) Communication and ICT skills

o) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Critical report (60%)

Policy brief (40%)

Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 2

Module Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the context, challenges and skills of diplomatic practice in a rapidly changing international environment.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically evaluate the context of international political, cultural and economic relations within which diplomacy takes place

b) Analyse the processes of negotiation within international diplomacy

c) Critically evaluate the important of key international events on the practice of diplomacy today

d) Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving approaches to diplomatic practice

e) Critically assess the impact of ethnic and regional conflicts on the conduct of diplomats

f) Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy, including assessments of diplomatic situations

g) Formulate research questions and research strategies for informing diplomatic practice

h) Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills

i) Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience.

j) Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills

k) Communication and ICT Skills

l) Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to diplomatic practice

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Seminars (16 hours)

Lectures (12 hours)

Assessment

Written Exam (70%)

Essay (30%)

Network Security

Module Description

This module covers the main concepts and technical details of network security properties, mechanisms, protocols and applications that are widely in use.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Demonstrate knowledge of main concepts related to the network security properties, mechanisms, protocols, and applications that are widely in use in today’s communication systems and networks, and be able to relate their knowledge to network security issues in real-world scenarios

b) Understand the principles of security in computer networks, concepts, models and architectures of available network security mechanisms

c) Understand the security in the Internet and web-based applications

d) Analyse detailed concepts pertaining to the network security architectures and their use

e) Recognise limitations, and design possible solutions for existing problems in web-based applications, common security architectures & APIs

f) Demonstrate gained experience in the Internet security and security concept in web-based applications, common security architectures & APIs

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (120 hours)

Lectures (26 hours)

Tutorial (4 hours)

Assessment

Final Coursework Report (30%)

Exam (70%)

International Protocol and Etiquette

Module Description

The aims of this module are to strengthen students' understanding and awareness of the importance of diplomatic protocol and gain a good grasp of different protocol cultures. The module will provide students with the opportunity to critically engage and evaluate empirical cases where protocol and etiquette related issues have critical impact on the outcome of a diplomatic situation/crisis.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Undertake a project development and management process, through the critical application of knowledge to simulated situations such as hosting of a World Summit, or heads of state visit, appreciating different stages of such process and the challenges these entail

b) Work in teams to apply innovative problem solving methods to evaluate and find solutions to simulated diplomatic situations, through solid understanding and utilization of knowledge in the current practices and procedures of international protocol and etiquette, including:

*Formalised provisions, including the rights, privileges and obligations of diplomats enshrined in the Vienna Convention; how these have been applied and revised over time;

*Conventional (unwritten) norms and rules

*In the information age, the rule of internet etiquette or virtual protocol

c) Critically assess through the project ways in which protocol and etiquette may help transcend national boundaries and build relations across cultural, religious and political differences

d) Critically evaluate through the project the dilemmas and political balance that needs to be made between the preservation of traditional protocol and etiquette rules and revisions of such rules.

e) Identify the areas that need to be addressed in a simulated diplomatic situation; collect and analyse appropriate data towards the evaluation and solution of the identified problem

f) Evaluate simulated situations of diplomatic engagement and effectively apply such assessment to find best solutions in groups

g) Develop appreciation for others' points of view, critically reflect on and evaluate the proposed solutions, and analyse them comparatively against possible alternatives.

h) Make informed decisions in time-limited situations, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time management to perform project leadership and management roles

i) Historical background of protocol: the evolution of the practices and norms at various historical epochs and different cultures that culminated into today¿s protocol procedures

j) Critical assessment of how these norms have constituted the very development of diplomatic relations, not only through observance but also through revision that has brought change on the global political scene

k) Contemporary practice of international protocol and etiquette, including rules and procedures of protocol for State and private visits; Event Management, with emphasis on risk management including security; the protocol of organization of press conferences

l) Protocol in International Organisations, and appreciation of cultural specificities practiced by large multilateral organisations such as the United Nations; how such protocol may be used to advance multiculturalism

m) Understand the Role of the Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps and diplomatic clubs and associations

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (130 hours)

Seminars (2 hours)

Lectures (14 hours)

Practical Classes and Workshops (4 hours)

Assessment

Group Project Plan (20%)

Individual Self Reflection Report (20%)

Group Simulation - Exercise/Presentation (60%)

Optional modules

Internet and Communication Networks

Module Description

This module provides students with an introduction to the Internet and communication networks systems, including computer networks and communications technologies, network architectures, protocol layers, algorithms, and application areas.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Have gained knowledge of communication networks, fixed and mobile communication systems and the Internet, and be able to relate their knowledge to real-world examples

b) Understand key elements and operation of the communication networks, fixed and mobile systems, and the Internet

c) Understand the data rates available on these networks and systems

d) Understand what applications would operate using these data rates with their major limitations of channel characteristics variations

e) Gain experience with system performance analysis, understanding of operational data rates and limitations

f) Critically analyse and reflect on the problems that the current communication networks are facing due to channel variations and relate some possible solutions

g) Obtain communication networks design experience and their practical limitations

h) Synthesise necessary information to evaluate data rates for given services, their channel error performances and the provided Quality of user Experience (QoE)

i) Apply their communication networks knowledge when working in industry

j) Critically evaluate communication networks related problems and deal with their possible solutions

k) Present themselves in the area of research and development in communication networks & the Internet to secure advanced level jobs

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (120 hours)

Lectures (26 hours)

Tutorials (4 hours)

Assessment

Exam (70%)

Final coursework report (30%)

Internet of Things and Applications

Module Description

This module covers the emerging IoT technologies including concepts, platforms, networked sensors/devices/actuators, applications, as well as their up-to-date examples. Device to device (M2M) connectivity is a key technology also covered.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Demonstrate understanding of the main concepts into the usage scenarios of IoT communication and highly scalable consumption of data from geographically dispersed physical objects and sensors, as well as the processing and delivery of such data to end-users.

b) Understand the interaction and communication between objects and with the environment to support decision making, improve situational awareness, and increase operational efficiency

c) Understand modern applications of smart cities and smart homes

d) Understand the concepts pertaining to the IoT systems

e) Critically analyse and reflect on the limitations and problems faced in those systems and relate some possible solutions

f) Analyse the emerging IoT platforms and devices, and the associated technologies considered in their design

g) Distinguish the requirements pertaining to different contextual information collected and exploited within different IoT scenarios

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (120 hours)

Lectures (26 hours)

Tutorials (4 hours)

Assessment

Final exam (60%)

Final coursework report (40%)

Information Management and Governance

Module Description

The aims of this module are to develop an understanding of the principles and potential for competitive advantage of effective information management in organisations. The module also aims to develop a critical understanding of compliance with legal and regulatory obligations in information handling and storage.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

a) Understand the importance of effective information management in organisations in contributing towards competitive advantage and efficient and effective operational management

b) Identify and discuss basic information management practices

c) Identify and critique significant current issues in data, information and knowledge management and networking technologies

d) Describe the application of information systems in alternative organizational contexts

e) Debate the issues relating to failure in information systems development

f) Critique the ways in which IT can deliver business value and assist in business transformation

g) Understand and discuss current legal and regulatory obligations relating to the secure and compliant handling and storage of organizational information.

h) Assess information management maturity and compliance in the student's own organization

i) Explore the applicability of different systems development approaches in the context of the student's organisation

j) Design a corporate information management and security policy for the student's organization

k) Work as a team on a range of practical exercises

l) Prepare and deliver effective oral presentations

m) Write effective business reports in an appropriate communication style

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Guided independent study (129 hours)

Lectures (21 hours)

Assessment

Individual report (75%)

Group presentation (25%)

International Security

Module Description

The aim of this module is to examine international security through a variety of traditional and non-traditional frames of reference. The overarching aim of the module is to provide students with a wider understanding of the security context in which politics, trade and conflict occur.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should have developed their ability to:

a) Evaluate various approaches to the study of international security

b) Evaluate the causes of international insecurity

c) Assess the utility of 'securitising' policy issues, and the impact of securitisation on public policy responses

d) Evaluate the role and behaviours of international organisations and states in the international system

e) Construct reasoned argument that synthesizes and analyses the merits of competing disciplinary, conceptual and theoretical perspectives outlined in the course of the module

f) Recognise established and emergent phenomena in international security and in crises that impact on the international system

g) Critically debate established and emergent security phenomena and crises

h) Apply - in a written submission - a strong understanding of key security concepts, and theories which contribute to the analysis of crises

i) Present critiques of empirically grounded case study materials

j) Reflect on their own learning and make use of constructive feedback

k) Gather and organise evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources

l) Work in small groups

m) Translate scholarship into practice

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (126 hours)

Lectures (24 hours)

Assessment

Coursework (60%)

Policy brief (40%)

Mobile Networks and Clouds

Module Description

This module focuses on networks and cloud technologies. The first part of the module includes an introduction to the latest mobile broadband and communication technologies, including their network architectures and radio interface protocols, covering 3GPP LTE mobile broadband radio access, network architecture, and radio interface architecture. The second part includes a brief overview of the cloud technology and covers the service and deployment models, media cloud applications and challenges, mobile clouds, relations of clouds with handling big data, and privacy and security issues in cloud services.

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Critically analyse mobile communication networks, cloud systems and their interactions with each other as well as with data and media processing and communications, and be able to relate their knowledge to real world examples

b) Understand mobile broadband communication technologies, including their network architectures and radio interface protocols

c) Understand mobile broadband access techniques, systems performances and limitations

d) Understand the principles of cloud computing technology, media clouds and applications, and the associated challenges

e)Understand the relations of clouds to handling big data and importance of security in clouds Skills

f) Evaluate the understanding the functioning of mobile broadband systems and relate the gained knowledge to real-world examples

g) Assess the concepts pertaining to the cloud systems, and their relations to the media applications, big data and security

h) Apply gained knowledge in mobile broadband communication in understanding the different wireless communication techniques and the system performance

i) Examine the relationship of cloud principles and their operation in real world scenarios

j) Critically analyse challenges posed by both mobile networks and cloud systems, and apply problems solving skills in the industry for tackling problems and providing solutions for both mobile communications and cloud services

k) Demonstrate competitiveness in both mobile networks and cloud systems

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 2

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (120 hours)

Lectures (26 hours)

Tutorials (4 hours)

Assessment

Final Coursework Report (30%)

Exam (70%)

Second subject modules

Management Skills

Module Description

The aims of this module are for the student to:

a) Understand and analyse key aspects of management and leadership;

b) Develop a foundation of management knowledge and skills that can be related to diplomacy and diplomatic practice

c) Develop a core understanding of management and organisational practice that will inform subsequent modules

d) Understand and analyse the Management of Change within an organisational setting

e) Uunderstand the relationship between departments within an organizational environment

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

a) Analyse organisational behaviour and identify the changing nature of organisation

b) Evaluate how the process of change has implications for diplomats and officials

c) Calculate the basis of investment appraisal and financial decision making

d) Analyse the relationship between diplomacy and the organizational body

e) Discuss and debate the evolving nature of management within organisations

e) Critically assess the nature of management and leadership within organisations and diplomatic practice

f) Construct strategies aimed at people motivation

g) Understand the Ethical Dimensions within a organisational environment.

h) Write an essay in a coherent and logical fashion

i) Collect ideas and data from a range of sources

j) Learn and work in an independent fashion

k) Demonstrate a research capability

Modular Weight

15 Credits

Delivery Period

Semester 1

Teaching and Learning

Guided independent study (122 hours)

Lectures (28 hours)

Assessment

Coursework (60%)

Oral Exam (40%)


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